Building an A/C motor to lift up to ~40 pounds

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  #1  
Old 09-08-14, 02:06 PM
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Question Building an A/C motor to lift up to ~40 pounds

Hi,

I'll keep this really short. I need (want) to build a small A/C fed motor that, through a system of sprockets that we already have in place, can lift a bucket containing up to 40 pounds of stuff. Is this possible to do without a shop or spending at least $150?

Thanks.
 
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Old 09-08-14, 02:17 PM
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Can you build an electric motor without a shop? No. You CAN couple a motor to a gear (or chain) drive to accomplish your task but a few more details are necessary.

I once made an elevator with a 1/2 horsepower motor close-coupled to a 40:1 gear reducer. It would lift 300 pounds easily. I did have to add an electric brake between the motor and the gear reducer.
 
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Old 09-08-14, 02:28 PM
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I can get a little 1/2 HP A/C motor locally for about $80, but gear reducers seem rather expensive. Does the HP rating have to match the engine?

Edit: I'm not that experienced with electronics - could you provide a basic breakdown of what I would need?
 
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Old 09-08-14, 03:00 PM
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Why reinvent the wheel. Why not by an electric hoist? Example: 440 lb. Electric Hoist with Remote Control $20 more then the motor you were going to buy.
 
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Old 09-08-14, 03:04 PM
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That would be handy.
But that's no fun.
 
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Old 09-10-14, 11:59 AM
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Still wondering about this, searching has been pretty useless.
 
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Old 09-10-14, 01:23 PM
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This is more a DIY forum then a hobbyist forum. We are mostly to help with problems around the house.
 
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Old 09-10-14, 03:18 PM
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How about using a garage door opener motor. They lift 40 all day long and already have a sprocket for a chain drive. You could likely find one for free.
 
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Old 09-10-14, 07:33 PM
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I'll try to find a garage door opener.
Sorry, in my haste I was unable to find something suitable.
 
  #10  
Old 09-11-14, 12:30 AM
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Why don't you tell us in detail just what you are trying to accomplish? Building a hoist is a fairly straightforward thing, it is the details that are difficult. How do you plan to stop the hoist at the ends of travel? How are you going to hold the load at the top? How high do you have to lift the load? Are you going to need guide rails? Why is the limit at forty pounds? Is this a toy just to prove you can do it or are you planning on actually doing some kind of work?
 
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Old 09-11-14, 03:35 PM
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I work as a sound technician in a local theatre. We bring small pieces of equipment, such as a light to hang (hence the 40lb limit), up from the basement to the catwalk of the 60ft ceiling in a sort of bucket. Right now, we have to lean over the railing for ten minutes lifting this bucket, which, if you have to do it multiple times a day or hour, can be quite taxing. We'd rather just build a little lift so we can continue hanging lights, handling speakers, doing cues, etc.

There's enough open space in the hole that it can swing around a bit, so we won't really need rails. We can remove the bucket via a hook at the top. It's making myself and the other tech's lives a hell of a lot easier, hehe.
 
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Old 09-11-14, 04:23 PM
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Then why not use an electric hoist as I linked to. That is what they are for. This being a work space you also have to remember OSHA. Some kind of jerry built rig might not set well with them. Then there is the civil liability if something goes wrong.
 
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Old 09-11-14, 05:51 PM
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I have to agree with Ray that where you are using this lift puts this thread in a totally different light.
Being a commercial space you can not legally do what you are proposing.

I personally would put more trust in a person holding a rope than a jury rigged, untested or approved mechanical lift.
 
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Old 09-11-14, 06:07 PM
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Oh, no no, that's not the case. The guy running the theatre is a big DIY guy and he thinks it would be "fun".
 
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Old 09-11-14, 06:36 PM
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The guy running the theatre is a big DIY guy and he thinks it would be "fun".
There are names for people like that but it would be against forum rules for me to use them. I would distance myself from him and his disregard for safety. If an accident happens he may blame it on you.
 
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