GFCI Plug & Switch combo


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Old 09-11-14, 07:57 AM
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Question GFCI Plug & Switch combo

Is anyone aware of any manufacturer that makes a 15A GFCI toggle (not rocker) switch and plug combination. All I can find are rocker types. And if its not asking for too much, the preferred color is ivory.
Thanks

Dave
 
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Old 09-11-14, 08:35 AM
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Do you mean something like this:

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Or one that doesn't use a Decora cover plate?

Above image from Home Depot took less that a minute to find using Google Advanced Image Search
 
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Old 09-11-14, 10:05 AM
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Sorry, but no. That is the usual rocker type of switch. I am looking for the standard toggle type, like you would normally get on a standard switch. Mounted over a plug, with GFCI protection.
 
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Old 09-11-14, 10:42 AM
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Yes, I didn't look close enough. Can I ask why it matters?
 
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Old 09-11-14, 06:56 PM
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switch and plug combination
It's not a plug, it's a receptacle. Plugs are a male device that have at least two blades and are inserted into receptacles.
 
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Old 09-11-14, 08:29 PM
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OK. 15A GFCI Toggle switch and receptacle combination is what I need.
We currently have the rocker type, as shown below by Ray2047. In one location, we have had to replace the unit 3 times, because the rocker doesn't work correctly. When we had a non GFI unit there, with a toggle type switch, we never had a problem. it was there for years, protected by another GFI device. We have undergone a rewiring in the house, so now it is the first device and needs to be GFI protected. Add that to the fact that my wife just cannot get used to the rocker switch. She complains the rocker is too small, and they tend to need replacing much too often.
 
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Old 09-11-14, 08:34 PM
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Replace the single gang box with a double gang and then you can use a standard toggel switch.
 
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Old 09-12-14, 06:05 AM
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Unfortunately, there isn't enough room. This box is tightly sandwiched between 2 close studs. It is in a bathroom on a 6 in. section of wall as you enter. It is also the only place it can be mounted. It is a small half bath, only 2 fixtures, so this is the main switch and receptacle to the room.
 
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Old 09-12-14, 06:23 AM
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I have seen bathrooms where the switch for the light is just outside the door. The idea of the switch outside may seem a bit odd at first but think a bout it. Bu adjusting height only slightly you could get two boxes in the spaces one facing each direction.

Plan B place a Deadface GFCI instead of a switch outside then you could use a non GFCI combo like you use to have.

There are other variations of the above idea.
 
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Old 09-12-14, 06:49 AM
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Not to blow holes in your suggestions, but:
We have 2 other rooms with switches outside the rooms. One is a 3-way switch, the other is a single pole. That isn't a problem.
The bathroom is off the kitchen. The wall closest to it already has a double gang box that has been rewired as kitchen circuits. In fact, this combo switch used to be fed off the GFI in that box. During the rewire, this bathroom is now on its own circuit, along with the main bathroom upstairs. This is, in fact, the first device on the bathroom circuit, so it is protecting the rest of the circuit.
Adding another box and switch to the kitchen wall, so close to the other double gang box, is simply going to be too much. Even throwing in a triple gang box, with the switch for the bath would be pushing it. That was why we mouinted the combo device to start with. We were hoping to get the toggle device vs rocker back though.
 
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Old 09-12-14, 07:48 AM
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Then replace the circuit breaker with a GFCI circuit breaker and install a simple combination switch receptacle which has the toggle type switch.
 
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Old 09-12-14, 08:16 AM
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Prime case of not seeing the tree for the forest. The answer is so simple, but I kept trying to complicate it to the point where it was driving me nuts. Thanks CasualJoe.
 
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Old 09-12-14, 08:27 AM
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Prime case of not seeing the tree for the forest. The answer is so simple, but I kept trying to complicate it to the point where it was driving me nuts. Thanks CasualJoe.
Using a GFCI breaker is not a perfect solution, but it solves the problem of wanting a toggle type handle on switch. Using a GFCI type breaker now means that the light will also be GFCI protected and a nuisance trip will leave you in the dark where the combination type GFCI receptacle/switch can be wired without the light being GFCI protected. I suppose it's a tradeoff to keep peace in the house.
 
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Old 09-12-14, 10:03 AM
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In this case, we need the light GFI protected also, since it is located very close to the shower. I think arc fault would have tripped much too often, due to the moisture in the room. The GFCI breaker may serve the needs we have.
 
 

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