Connecting ovens in a NYC school


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Old 09-13-14, 02:44 PM
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Connecting ovens in a NYC school

Can I use regular emt pipes inside a school cafeteria in New York?
 
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Old 09-13-14, 03:28 PM
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Thats a Pro question and I'm not sure we have anyone real familiar with all NY codes. Best thing would be to call your local Codes Compliance office.

I know conduit is required everywhere in some jurisdictions, but being a school, there may be even more strict standards.
 
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Old 09-13-14, 04:00 PM
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Working in a school is typically going to require a contractor. They should know the rules. Job specifications should also be able to tell you the materials allowed.
 

Last edited by pcboss; 09-14-14 at 07:18 AM.
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Old 09-13-14, 08:11 PM
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A permit and inspection will probably be required too. Are you licensed in NYC?
 
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Old 09-14-14, 07:20 AM
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No.. I'm an electrician mechanic doing this for a contractor who doesnt know much about electrical.
I thought about using EMT with compression fittings, but need to make sure if it is ok... Otherwise I might just use aluminum.....
 
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Old 09-14-14, 07:46 AM
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It does not sound like you have the background or any license or insurance. I would pass on this to avoid exposing yourself to any risk or liability should something go wrong.
 
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Old 09-14-14, 08:09 AM
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No.. I'm an electrician mechanic doing this for a contractor who doesnt know much about electrical.
Someone must hold a license, either you or the contractor you work for. I don't know if New York licenses each individual electrician or if they license contractors, but I suspect that contractors are licensed at the local level and must not only take a test, but also provide insurance certificates and bonding certificates to have the license issued. Without a license you cannot take out the required permits. Without the required permits you cannot call for inspection.

I agree with PCboss on this, I'd also pass on this job and not risk the liability and/or fines.
 
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Old 09-14-14, 09:32 AM
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I can get an answer for you later from a retired Local 3 electrician. The contractor who hired you has to be concerned with the inspection if there is one. It's not on your shoulders. BBL
 
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Old 09-14-14, 06:57 PM
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I spoke to a retired Local 3 guy today. He said that he wasn't 100% sure but he thought that threaded conduit maybe required since there is water in a cafeteria & the EMT connectors may not be waterproof. He also said that many contractors don't like to work for the city because they take forever to pay, especially if they find one little mistake. I can call another retired Local 3 guy tomorrow.
 
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Old 09-15-14, 09:12 AM
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I spoke to a retired Local 3 guy today. He said that he wasn't 100% sure
The problem with just talking to someone from the Local is that they do not always know the reasons behind using a particular material they are being told by their office to use on a job nor do they they always know the issues with the permits and inspections. It would be better, if you know one, to talk to a project manager from their office who deals with the permit office and permit issues directly. Not knocking the guys in the field, but some project managers do not communicate all the details and information to their guys in the field.
 
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Old 09-15-14, 09:32 AM
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He wasn't just any Local 3 guy. He was the electrical supervisor when they built the World Trade Center, the first time.
 
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Old 09-15-14, 10:10 AM
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He wasn't just any Local 3 guy. He was the electrical supervisor when they built the World Trade Center, the first time.
Ok, he was a foreman or general foreman, can read plans and can run a large crew. I doubt there are any plans for connecting the school ovens. This would be a small design/build job.
 
 

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