European style(???) plug device in America

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  #1  
Old 09-16-14, 11:30 AM
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European style(???) plug device in America

So, I am looking to purchase a machine that can only be bought with a 220V European style(correct me please if this isn't european plug) plug.
I would like to wire a 240V socket in my home.
Most people say that they rewire the actual plug on the machine itself to an american plug, and then wire a 240v american socket in their home to plug the newly rewired power cord into.
My question is, would it be possible to purchase a 220v socket with this style, and wire this in my home so that I don't have to rewire the power cord, I can just simply plug and play?
In other words, is it possible to have a 240V european socket wired into an american home?

What would you personally do?
here is a photo of the power cord
It is 220V
2300W
heres a link to take a look at the machine and info
http://www.ebay.com/itm/190740447600...%3AMEBIDX%3AIT
[ATTACH=CONFIG]38380[/ATTACH]
 
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Last edited by yum114; 09-16-14 at 01:33 PM.
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  #2  
Old 09-16-14, 11:41 AM
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I don't see any link.

US voltage is almost universally 240 volts at 60 Hertz. European voltages are more often 220 volts at 50 Hertz. It is possible that your device is incompatible with US power.
 
  #3  
Old 09-16-14, 01:35 PM
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Original post has been updated with a link to the machine.
It does work in the US as many people have them and use them here. It's also advertised as working in the US everywhere I've seen them sold online. but they just say use a transformer if I recall correctly, but I think thats a bad idea
 
  #4  
Old 09-16-14, 02:15 PM
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Quite the machine!

I would recommend using a transformer, if for no other reason than most European power systems are 220 volts with one side of the line grounded. In the US it is the neutral line of the derived 120 volt that is grounded. This could set up a dangerous situation using the 220 machine on our system in that a fault could impress a dangerous voltage on the case of the machine. Using a full insulating (not an auto-transformer) would make it much safer.
 
  #5  
Old 09-16-14, 04:53 PM
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You could post in their support forums.
Manufacturer's page - Scotle IR6000 Infrared BGA Rework Station
 
  #6  
Old 09-16-14, 05:14 PM
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Or just buy the correct power cord - Amazon.com: 6-15P to C13 Power Cord, 6 Foot - 15A, 250V, 14/3 SJT Wire: Electronics and use a 240v/15a circuit with a NEMA 6-15R
 
  #7  
Old 09-16-14, 05:30 PM
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Test the appliance (use an ohmmeter or the ohms function of a multimeter) to see if the case is bonded to one side of the line whereby the appliance needs to be plugged into a power source with one of the two conductors grounded. Do not use the appliance without an isolation transformer if the case is so bonded.

Yes you could buy a European receptacle and install it in your house but it would be better to install a U.S. 240 volt receptacle in the wall and buy/make an adapter that plugs into the wall receptacle and you plug the appliance into the adapter.
 
  #8  
Old 10-08-14, 02:58 PM
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rewiring a machine to fit a dryer plug

Mod note: Beginning of second thread merged to first.

OK, I had another thread a while ago about wiring a new outlet for a rework machine that I will be using soon. I have to put wiring my own outlet on hold though.
So, now, I'm focused on a dryer plug receptacle.
I've got a few questions.
Bare with me, as I don't know much at the moment, but will be able to supply more info and pics in a moment.
the questions.
The machine is Asian plug 220v 2300W 11amps I believe at max capacity.

1. If the receptacle is a 30Amp outlet, with one of the BIG plugs being needed(see images below for comparison of big and little plugs), what type of plugin should I rewire to my machines cord? Should I use a 15amp plug(to plug into the 30amp outlet), or should I go with a 30amp plug(although the machine is only rated like 11amps.

2. What would be the difference between using the bigger plug or smaller plug show below? Both are rated at the same amperage. I'm almost sure the dryer plug requires the bigger plug, but at the moment, my machine is just a smaller plugin.

3. if the dryer outlet has 4 prongs, how would I go about converting my machines cord(which i believe only has 3 wires) to the 4 prong plug?


Difference between big outlet vs small one(I would be needing a plug end though, not outlet)
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my current plug end
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Last edited by ray2047; 10-08-14 at 04:44 PM.
  #9  
Old 10-08-14, 03:12 PM
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You need to protect your machine at 20A max. A dryer is usually 30A. Why not keep with your existing plans of using a 20A outlet?
 
  #10  
Old 10-08-14, 03:23 PM
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Because the house that I am in, will not allow me to do anything with breaker box. It's either use dryer, or nothing
 
  #11  
Old 10-08-14, 03:36 PM
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The problem is the dryer receptacle has no ground. Therefore even if you made a temporary power supply to plug in the dryer receptacle can't be used. Run a ground wire and change the the receptacle to 4-wire and you can plug in a temporary power supply with a 20 amp breaker.

Is this residential or commercial space you are renting?
 
  #12  
Old 10-08-14, 03:43 PM
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This is a town house.
Thing is, it's the running wires and make drastic changes that I can't do at the moment.
The pplug that I'm trying to plug in, is 3 pronged, the dryer outlet I believe is also 3 pronged. Only 1 of them is without a ground?

I believe my plug is neutral earth and live
Wouldn't the dryer plug be hot hot and ground?
 
  #13  
Old 10-08-14, 03:46 PM
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No. 3-wire dryer receptacle is hot, hot, neutral. I don't remember the details of your previous thread. If the dryer receptacle is wired with conduit it can serve as your ground.
 
  #14  
Old 10-08-14, 04:18 PM
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The small receptacle you pictured is a NEMA 6-20, not a 30 amp receptacle. Will your machine be affected by our 60 Hz frequency?
 
  #15  
Old 10-08-14, 04:45 PM
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Larry this is a continuation of another thread of his.

Threads merged to avoid confusion.
 
  #16  
Old 10-08-14, 05:39 PM
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Ok, so here is the outlet that I may be able to use, and here is the current, dryer plug that is plugged into it.
With that being said, I assume that there is a plug this big for only 15-20amps? If so, shall I wire the 15-20amp plug of the same style to my system, and plug it in(the receptacle is wired to a 30amp fuse)
Also, I assume since this is 4 pronged, that there is a ground for it. Now, when I go to wire my 3 pronged power cord(hot earth and ground). What would I end up wiring?
I'm assuming that the current receptacle is 2 hots, and ground, and what else???
Sorry for so many questions and I truly do appreciate all of the help that everyone here is giving me.
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  #17  
Old 10-08-14, 06:35 PM
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so here is the outlet that I may be able to use, and here is the current, dryer plug that is plugged into it.
With that being said, I assume that there is a plug this big for only 15-20amps?
No there is not. The higher the amp the larger the plug.

The plug that I'm trying to plug in, is 3 pronged, the dryer outlet I believe is also 3 pronged.
That is a 4 wire plug not 3 so you do have a ground. You are good to go for a temporary power supply. Now all you need to do is build the temporary power supply.

For that you will need a 60 amp main lug subpanel, a 4-wire 14-30 dryer cord, and a a 2 pole20 amp breaker, plus miscellaneous fittings.
 
  #18  
Old 10-08-14, 06:44 PM
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I didn't want to do that though. My hopes were to simply rewire the machines power cord, with a plug that would fit the current dryer outlet(the one in the photo)
 
  #19  
Old 10-08-14, 06:51 PM
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You may not want to do that, but it's what you have to do if you want power for this.
 
  #20  
Old 10-08-14, 07:18 PM
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.
 
  #21  
Old 10-08-14, 11:58 PM
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If I could set something like that up, Ray. I would just wire a real 220v outlet from main box. Issue is, this has to be a simple, plug and play right in the socket.
So what I'm trying to do, is rewire my european/chinese(I believe) power cord(Live, earth, Neutral)
to a US 4 pronged dryer cord(Live, Live, neutral, Ground I believe)

This wouldn't work to accomplish that?
To connect a European 3 wire 240V washer to a US 4 prong 240V outlet do you connect the two hot wires to the single hot connection on the washer

Basically, what they say is, connect the neutral(from the current 3 wire cord) to one of the lives on the 4 pronged cord. Connect the live (from the current 3 wire cord) to the other live on the 4 pronged dryer cord, then connect the ground(from the current 3 wire cord) to the ground on the 4 pronged cord. Leave the neutral on the 4 prong cord empty
 
  #22  
Old 10-09-14, 12:57 AM
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It would but it would not be totally safe unless you changed the breaker to 20 amps and then you couldn't use the dryer.
Issue is, this has to be a simple, plug and play right in the socket.
That is simple to assemble and does plug into the dryer receptacle. That is where the cord in the picture is plugged in.

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Last edited by ray2047; 10-09-14 at 05:36 AM.
  #23  
Old 10-09-14, 08:45 AM
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Yes, I understand that. But, this is someone else's house. And this would be something that I've got to take when I leave, every time I leave. With that said, it would be easier to have my machine and my plug. When you get to assembling an additional breaker(even if it is only plugged into the dryer outlet) people tend to think a little differently.
 
  #24  
Old 10-09-14, 11:24 AM
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Ok, what I think I'm going to do is wire up a dryer cord(they don't make them this big at only 15 amps?) then wire up my current cord neutral to a hot, the hot to another hot, and the ground to the ground, and leave the neutral for the new dryer cord empty.

If I do go this route, I would purchase a cord like this
Shop GE 48-in 4-Prong Electric Dryer Cord at Lowes.com

but that comes with 4 cords, so, if I'm not using the neutral, what do i do with the neutral cord? How do I make sure it doesn't cause any trouble??
 
  #25  
Old 10-09-14, 11:29 AM
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Better to make an adapter though still not right. Leave your 15 amp plug on your machine and connect a 14-30 male cord cap to one end of a foot long piece of 10-3 SO cord and a female 6-20 cord cap at the other end. At the male cord cap connect black and white to the hots and green to ground. Leave the neutral empty. At the female cord cap same connections, black and white to hots and green to ground.

.
 
  #26  
Old 10-09-14, 12:08 PM
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Ok.... so let me see if I got this right. Is 10-3 SO cord, the same as 10-3 romex? Would I be able to use romex? or is there some difference in the two?


Now, let me put this together in order...
Rewire this
[ATTACH=CONFIG]39742[/ATTACH]
To this


[ATTACH=CONFIG]39736[/ATTACH]
[ATTACH=CONFIG]39719[/ATTACH]
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[ATTACH=CONFIG]39741[/ATTACH]






I assume that the outlet in the first image would go inside of an actual outlet box, correct? but instead of mounting it IN or ON a wall, the box would just sit out?
Also, in order to get my machines UK cord into the outlet in image 1, I would have to rewire my cord to a plug end that fits that outlet correct? so i would also need that. or can I just wire my machines cord to the one I previously bought
in the bottom middle
[ATTACH=CONFIG]39721[/ATTACH]








Also, don't use the Leviton outlet that I have shown in the photo above?
 
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Last edited by yum114; 10-09-14 at 03:06 PM.
  #27  
Old 10-09-14, 01:09 PM
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Is 10-3 SO cord, the same as 10-3 romex
No. SO cord has only 3 wires - black, white green. 10-3 Romex has four wires - black, red, white, bare.
Would I be able to use romex? or is there some difference in the two?
No you can't use Romex. It is not rated for use as a flexible code.
I assume that the outlet in the first image would go inside of an actual outlet box, correct?
No. It just goes on the end of the cord. (Think of it as a female "plug".)
I would have to rewire my cord to a plug end that fits that outlet correct?
Yes, the 6-15p you already bought for your machine.

I can't see the female cord cap at at the top. Is it a 6-20r?
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Above will work and is probably safe but is not code compliant.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 10-09-14 at 02:20 PM.
  #28  
Old 10-09-14, 01:23 PM
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You can't see which cord?
Do you meant the outlet? the Leviton one in the photo with all the other stuff I bought?
If that's what youre talking about, here it is
[ATTACH=CONFIG]39724[/ATTACH]

But you said that yours doesn't require a box so to use that one instead
the Leviton one pictured
20 Amp/250 V Grounding
Commercial grade, NEMA 6-20R, 2P, 3W
 
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  #29  
Old 10-09-14, 02:22 PM
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No typo on my part. Should have read "cord cap". Referring to:

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Is it a 6-20? You use a female cord cap not a receptacle as pictured in your last post.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 10-09-14 at 03:00 PM.
  #30  
Old 10-09-14, 02:47 PM
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Ok, so you meant, not the top of the image, but the top of the packaging for that cap at the bottom of that photo, right? Are you talking about the Hubbell?
When clicking your image, I get this message
Invalid Attachment specified. If you followed a valid link, please notify the administrator

Read more: http://www.doityourself.com/forum/at...#ixzz3FgeVTpfe
But if you're talking about the one in my image at the bottom with the black and yellow packaging, it is a 15A 250v Nema 6-15P

This is it here
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Pass-Seym...rd=ps5666xccv4
 
  #31  
Old 10-09-14, 02:54 PM
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Nevermind I got it. You mean THIS image. Yes, it's 6-20 I did a search for it, and all of them images were sideways like that so the plugin couldn't be seen. I can't find it at home depot/lowes, so I take it this is something that needs to be ordered online?

[ATTACH=CONFIG]39735[/ATTACH]
 
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  #32  
Old 10-09-14, 02:57 PM
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Or buy at a supply house or a hardware store.
 
  #33  
Old 10-09-14, 02:59 PM
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Found one at Home depot :-)
Pass & Seymour 20 Amp NEMA 6-20R Extra-Hard Use Connector-PS5469XCCV4 at The Home Depot

[ATTACH=CONFIG]39736[/ATTACH]
 
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  #34  
Old 10-09-14, 03:01 PM
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Good. Just think of it as making up a one foot long extension cord from scratch.
 
  #35  
Old 10-09-14, 03:09 PM
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The proper name for the 16-20 is 16-20r, thats why I couldn't find it at first.
what would the proper name for "14-30 male cord cap" be? as I'm not finding anything local, and not many options online

Damn. I even searched 14-30p.
Only thing I'm finding, are dryer cables with wires in them already.
:-(
 
  #36  
Old 10-09-14, 03:52 PM
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IIRC, the 14-30 plugs at big box are sold as 14-50 with a spare blade to change it to a 14-30.
 
  #37  
Old 10-09-14, 04:17 PM
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R is for receptacle P is for plug (male). No need to include the letters if it is obvious what you are referring to. Just for the record the correct term is receptacle. Outlet is just anywhere power can be tapped including lights and switches.

Of course we still don't know if it will work on 60hz. If it doesn't your out of luck.
 
  #38  
Old 10-09-14, 04:39 PM
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It says 50/60hz in many places that sell the machine. So, I assumer that 60hz would work.Also, like i've stated, there are many who use this machine in the US without issues. but, they are running 220v power receptacles. With very few of them using transformers.
 
  #39  
Old 10-09-14, 05:00 PM
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It says 50/60hz
Ooops I missed that.
but, they are running 220v power receptacles. With very few of them using transformers.
The nominal voltage in the US is 240 not 220.
 
  #40  
Old 10-09-14, 05:07 PM
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haha, yes. So much back and forth between uk and us, I keep mixing my numbers up.

Justin, thx for the tip as well. I did some digging and the plug linked below, when seen on amazon, not many place state it, but it seems that this actually comes with both pieces.
So it should be the same when bought at lowes which is where I found it.
http://www.lowes.com/pd_246879-1571-...ductId=3537750

One thing, since I wont be using the neutral prong(or hooking any wire up to it), since the neutral can be swapped for either the straight or L shaped one, is it possible that instead of swapping it, I can just simply leave it empty? and not actually put ANY prong in the neutral space? Or would that be a bad idea?
 
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