crimping question


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Old 09-16-14, 03:00 PM
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crimping question

I used these female connectors from TYCO.
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The directions says to use a UL approved AMP crimping tool. It said they recommended a Tyco brand #58078-3. I didn't read this until after installing it with my Ideal crimper... with the blue/red/yellow crimp spaces like this one:

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I used the red crimper notch for the red connector (18-22).

Now I fear since my tool looks different then the one suggested I have poorly installed this joint.

Is this the same thing? Is my ideal connector an AMP? (does that refer to the color coding?)
 
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Old 09-16-14, 03:02 PM
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You are fine. The manufacturer just wants you to buy THEIR tool.
 
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Old 09-16-14, 03:08 PM
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You can do a practice joint on a spare piece of wire. Tug on it and you will see if you have a good connection. A good crimp tool is hard to find.
 
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Old 09-16-14, 03:28 PM
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Its that they say a UL approved AMP crimp tool OR their tool....

So is the red/yellow/blue crimping tool proper for this application? Is that AMP?
 
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Old 09-16-14, 03:30 PM
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A good crimp tool is hard to find.
Not really, but you are unlikely to find one in a big box mega-mart homecenter. A good crimper is expensive.

I have several ratcheting crimpers that have a price from $50 on up to a couple of hundred dollars. I don't use the $8.00 special crimper for anything but cutting bolts.
 
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Old 09-16-14, 03:30 PM
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AMP is a manufacturer. I doubt that tool you have is an AMP.
 
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Old 09-16-14, 03:33 PM
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AMP is the name of the manufacturer. Other tools are made by Thomas & Betts, Ideal and probably other manufacturers.
 
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Old 09-16-14, 03:40 PM
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are you sure AMP is the manufacture? As AMP is imprinted on the connector that I removed and the connector that I replaced it with as in the photo. And I don't think they are referring to Amperage rating as neither connector has a numeral imprinted next to the AMP......
 
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Old 09-16-14, 03:55 PM
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Yes. They were once a separate company but are now owned by the conglomerate, Tyco, or TE as they are now using.

AMP Connectors - TE
 
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Old 09-16-14, 04:29 PM
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I see.. so AMP is Tyco and Tyco female disconnect is what I used. So the connector itself is no different than the other brand female connectors and my IDEAL crimper with the yellow/red/blue designation works just the same?

Theres also that code reference that says you must follow manufacture directions for devices and connectors and such so technically I commited a violation of the NEC.
 
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Old 09-16-14, 05:17 PM
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When I was an electric motor mechanic the company wanted you to use this type of crimper because they crimp end to end not cross ways so the whole length of the wire is crimped in.

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Mod note: Corrected post. Original image was Thomas and Betts but found better image from Kline.
 

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Old 09-16-14, 05:22 PM
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I have the one Ray pictured above. That's what I meant by being hard to find. Most of the cheap crimper jaws are too thin to crimp entire sleeve.
 
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Old 09-16-14, 05:34 PM
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I have the same exact ones and a similar pair by Ideal with yellow handles. For the occasional crimp what you used is fine but if you put on a lot of crimps on you'll want something like those T&B's, the Ideal one or the ratcheting ones like Furd mentioned.
 
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Old 09-16-14, 05:48 PM
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And IIRC the opening closest to the pivot crimps the skirt of the insulator on the connector to the wire insulation.
 
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Old 09-16-14, 05:57 PM
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For the hundred or so connections I used in my lifetime the cheap ones do fine. As Handyone says, just tug on it and you'll know soon enough if its a good connection or not. But I agree that if you do enough of them a high quality tool is a must.
 
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Old 09-16-14, 06:19 PM
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And IIRC the opening closest to the pivot crimps the skirt of the insulator on the connector to the wire insulation.
The tip crimps the metal barrel, the pivot die crimps the insulation.
 
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Old 09-16-14, 06:26 PM
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And IIRC the opening closest to the pivot crimps the skirt of the insulator on the connector to the wire insulation
The tip crimps the metal barrel, the pivot die crimps the insulation.
Are you guys saying there are two crimping points on those red disconnects I used? One in the center for the copper and then the skirt gets crimped to the insulation too?

ANother thing I was concerned about was that in order to get the two wires to insert cleanly into the hole in the connector I twisted them together... is that acceptable or should they have laid flat on top of each other? BTW: The package for the connector said two wires was acceptable for the connector but didn't say how to join them.
 
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Old 09-16-14, 06:36 PM
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No... you did it right. They don't get crimped twice.
 
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Old 09-16-14, 06:47 PM
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Funny thing about the crimp tool Ray posted, the logo on them is Kline Tools.
 
  #20  
Old 09-16-14, 07:03 PM
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My favorite crimper is the AMP 59250 which is made for red and blue insulated terminals. Prices seem to run from a low of around $100 (used) to a high of over $2000. I got mine from the surplus store of my former employer for about $5 to $10 as I recall.

[ATTACH=CONFIG]38397[/ATTACH]


My next favorite is a Thomas & Betts WT1455. I think I paid around $50 to $75 for that one about a dozen years ago.

[ATTACH=CONFIG]38399[/ATTACH]

Both images courtesy of ebay)
 
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Old 09-16-14, 07:14 PM
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OK Furd,
You win

Now that's a crimper.
 
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Old 09-16-14, 08:14 PM
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Funny thing about the crimp tool Ray posted, the logo on them is Kline Tools.
I changed to a better image and didn't check manufacturer. Guess to atone I will have to do like old time rock miners and crimp with my teeth.

Post has been corrected.
 
  #23  
Old 09-17-14, 07:17 AM
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I hope you haven't lost patience with me.

Last question. Those female disconnects I pointed out are rated for 10 amperes.

I used them on an electric dryer, on the neutral connection, which would serve the motor that spins the drum, the controls and a 10W light. Is there going to be more than 10 amperes on that connector?
 
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Old 09-17-14, 07:31 AM
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10 amps is at least 2X what your motor and light would consume.
 
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Old 09-17-14, 07:36 AM
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And to clarify--the best crimpers for plastic-insulated terminals have thick jaws with 2 different areas that crimp the metal sleeve on the wire AND the plastic skirt on the wire insulation in one motion. They have a ratchet that won't allow them to open until after fully closed on a terminal--assuring a complete tight crimp. They also can be adjusted and "calibrated".
That's why they are expensive.

The $8 pliers-type will work in a pinch but it's always best to get the best tools if you use them constantly.
 
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Old 09-17-14, 10:20 AM
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10 amps is at least 2X what your motor and light would consume.
are you sure about that? After all, that motor is spinning a 7 cubic ft drum of wet clothes.
 
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Old 09-17-14, 10:26 AM
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But it is through a gear box or pulley system that reduces motor speed. Horsepower to speed is an inverse ratio.
 
 

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