Afci


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Old 09-17-14, 05:18 AM
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Afci

Does the 2014 NEC require AFCI protection for the outdoor receptacle circuits at the front and back door?

Does the 2014 NEC require AFCI protection for dedicated receptacle circuits for over the range microwaves, refrigerators, through the wall 120 volt air conditioners, garbage disposals, and dishwashers?

I have heard that AFCI protection is required everywhere except receptacles in the bathroom and the garage.
 
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Old 09-17-14, 07:02 AM
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Not needed outdoors, basements, bathrooms, attics, and certain fire alarm circuits.

210.12 Arc-Fault Circuit-Interrupter Protection. Arcfault
circuit-interrupter protection shall be provided as required
in 210.12(A) (B), and (e). The arc-fault circuit interrupter
shall be installed in a readily accessible location.
(A) Dwelling Units. All 120-volt, single-phase, 15- and
20-ampere branch circuits supplying outlets or devices installed
in dwelling unit kitchens, family rooms, dining
rooms, living rooms, parlors, libraries, dens, bedrooms,
sunrooms, recreation rooms, closets, hallways, laundry areas,
or similar rooms or areas shall be protected by any of
the means described in 21 0.I2(A)(l) through (6):
 
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Old 09-21-14, 04:57 PM
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I started an upstairs ( living room, kitchen, dining room, laundry room, bedroom with back door onto a deck) rewire project with a permit under the 2011 NEC. With health problems and procrastination, I am finishing the project with a permit under the 2014 NEC.

The panel is a 200 amp Homeline with 40 slots.

Here is the 2011 NEC installed 120 volt 15 and 20 amp circuits:

Recessed lights, ceiling fans, a dining room light, a bathroom sink light, a porch light, smoke/CO detectors, and living room, dining room, and bedroom receptacles are on AFCI breaker circuits.

Kitchen counter, bathroom and outside receptacles are on regular breaker circuits with first receptacle GFCI.

Over the cook-top microwave, garbage disposer, dishwasher, refrigerator, and laundry room receptacles are on regular breaker circuits.

Here are my proposed modifications to meet the 2014 NEC:

Replace all the regular breakers with AFCI/GFCI combo breakers except for the bathroom and outside receptacles.

Is this plan OK?

Could I use AFCI breakers on the over the cook-top microwave, garbage disposer, and refrigerator receptacles?
 

Last edited by High Plains; 09-21-14 at 05:32 PM.
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Old 09-21-14, 11:57 PM
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You can use them but they are not required at this point.
 
 

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