bad GFIs?

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  #1  
Old 09-22-14, 01:30 PM
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bad GFIs?

I have 2 GFI's that are tripping on me and I'd like to know if the problem is most likely the GFI or the appliance that's plugged into it. Specifically:

GFI 1:
In our basement bathroom there is a light over the sink that is connected from a GFI that, as far as I can tell, doesn't power anything except the light. About a year ago I tried to turn on the light and found the GFI tripped, when no one had been in the bathroom. I reset the GFI and left it set. Later I found it tripped again, and the light wasn't on. The light isn't critical so I've left the GFI tripped and it hasn't been on.

GFI 2:
The sink and toilet in that same basement bathroom drain into a tank which is emptied by a pump. The pump plugs into a GFI outlet which doesn't power anything except the pump. The pump runs at least once a day. A few days ago the pump started to run and the GFI tripped. I reset the GFI and ran the pump, no problem. I filled up the tank with water and tried to run the pump again, the GFI tripped again.

The two GFI's are on the same wall, about 4 feet apart. I haven't checked yet to see if they have any wiring in common. Assuming they don't have wiring in common,
1) The light GFI is tripping when the light isn't even on. Why would that happen?
2) The pump GFI is trippng when it tries to run. Is the problem most likely the pump or the GFI?

We've been in this house 4 years and the pump has been working every day, up until a few days ago. It's enclosed in a wall so there's been no activity around it at all.
The light was used every day until the GFI started tripping about a year ago.

The bathroom is totally unusable now so any insights would be greatly appreciated.
 
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  #2  
Old 09-22-14, 02:27 PM
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Location: port chester n y
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(1), the fixture; any "leakage current" in the cables that extend beyond the GFI will cause this problem, and GFI's are "hyper-sensitive" to these currents.

(2) same with the pump; an internal leakage-current. You could operate the pump ONLY if the metallic frame of the motor has a solid Grounding connection. If the motor is cord-connected , a cord with Black, White, and Green conductors, and a Grounding receptacle with it's Green terminal thoroughly Grounded.
 
  #3  
Old 09-22-14, 07:36 PM
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You could operate the pump ONLY if the metallic frame of the motor has a solid Grounding connection. If the motor is cord-connected , a cord with Black, White, and Green conductors, and a Grounding receptacle with it's Green terminal thoroughly Grounded.
I don't really understand what you're saying here; the motor IS connected with a 3-conductor cord, and the ground terminal of the receptacle IS grounded. The pump's been working for over 4 years.
 
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