weatherhead question/photos

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Old 10-02-14, 05:58 AM
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weatherhead question/photos

POCO hook up of new service. Does this appear correct a having the adequate loops in the conductors?

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Old 10-02-14, 06:17 AM
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The angle on the photos is poor, but it looks like the conductors are all lower than the weatherhead.
 
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Old 10-02-14, 06:26 AM
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lower than the weatherhead? is that good thing?
 
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Old 10-02-14, 06:29 AM
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Lower means that rain water can't drip back down the line and into the weather head.
 
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Old 10-02-14, 06:37 AM
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They need to be lower than the WH so the water does not run uphill into the mast.
 
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Old 10-02-14, 06:44 AM
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In regards to the neutral connection.

Why is that not a crimp like the two others?
Does it appear possible water could leach into the insulation on that neutral and run down the mast on the interior of the wire, INSIDE of the insulation?

Thinking being that it is not covered like the two crimps.
 
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Old 10-02-14, 06:46 AM
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The angle on the photos is poor
I believe the angle is poor enough that a judgement cannot be made from these pictures.

Does it appear possible water could leach into the insulation on that neutral and run down the mast on the interior of the wire, INSIDE of the insulation?
The neutral connector looks fine, it's just different from the others. The intent of the drip loops is to keep water from following the outside of the wires and running into the weatherhead........and down the mast into the meter socket. To do that, the wires exiting the weatherhead must immediately drop below the height of the wire openings in the weatherhead.
 
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Old 10-02-14, 07:33 AM
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But I am seeing loops higher than the masthead in addition to the lower ones or is that just the angle?.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 10-02-14 at 08:31 AM.
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Old 10-02-14, 07:50 AM
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The angles are playing games, im snapping the photo from 13' below approx. The top photo is more accurate as I am off at a distance rather than in the second photo I am directly under it.

But thereare loops there though correct?

I guess when I think drip loop I think of the ones I have made on coax cable that are perfect circles almost.

Anyway, at the connection points, could water soak into the insulation and travel upward on the inside of the conductors insulation? I tried to draw it but it didn't come out so good....
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Also why is the neutral from the power company allowed to be unisulated and doesn't the green corrosion on the wire make that joint weak?
 
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Old 10-02-14, 08:33 AM
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why is the neutral from the power company allowed to be unisulated
Because its voltage to ground is ~0 volts.
 
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Old 10-02-14, 08:36 AM
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I thought of another question:

The point is your trying to stop the water that travels laterally along the service drop? And not neccearily water that lands on the customer portion of the wire because im thinking inevitably some water would get into the weatherhead in all cases if it wasn't siliconed?

Is it standard to silicon or seal the weatherhead during installation?
 
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Old 10-02-14, 11:19 AM
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Gravity pulls the water down, not up. The holes in the WH do not need to be sealed.

A drip loop is just a low point in the wiring. It does not need to be a complete loop.
 
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Old 10-03-14, 05:11 AM
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Im concerned the wrong size weatherhead was used for the conductors.

We have 100A service, I think that is #3 CU correct? Anyway, if you look in the photo the holes are significantly larger than the wire.

What do you think?

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Old 10-03-14, 08:36 AM
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We have 100A service, I think that is #3 CU correct? Anyway, if you look in the photo the holes are significantly larger than the wire.
Residential 100 amp service could use #4 or #3 CU OR #2 or #1 AL. You have a 2" weather head and it has 6 openings for the wire to exit the weatherhead; 3 smaller holes for 100 amp service and 3 larger holes for 200 amp service. It appears one of the larger holes was used, but I don't see that as a huge problem or anything that would keep it from passing inspection.
 
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Old 10-03-14, 09:00 AM
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Doesn't rain get in those holes? Should I seal them up?

Are those crimps in the first photo (with the red bands) are those bare? Should they be taped? What happens if they touch?
 

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Old 10-03-14, 07:43 PM
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Doesn't rain get in those holes? Should I seal them up?
The faceplate with the holes is mounted on an angle toward the ground and slightly recessed under the cover on the weatherhead; it is considered raintight. Under some circumstances, a hard blowing rain might get through, but what little bit that would be is negligible. I wouldn't plug the holes unless you have insects, such as bees, wasps or mud dobbers, entering the holes.

Are those crimps in the first photo (with the red bands) are those bare? Should they be taped? What happens if they touch?
They look bare to me and you would get fireworks if the touch, might even blow a primary fuse at the transformer. I'd leave them alone, they won't touch as far apart as they are. If I had to work near them I would probably tape them for my protection. The utility here uses a plastic cover that snaps over the connector providing that protection much more quickly than taping.
 
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Old 10-03-14, 08:52 PM
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Those are fully insulated crimps. The workmanship is a little sloppy on the POCO's part. I don't like leaving a crimp in a low spot or bottom of the drip loop as it could fill with water and corroded.

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Old 10-03-14, 08:53 PM
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The spliced they used on the phase conductors are insulated butt splices. If you touch them you shouldn't get a shock in theory, but either way I wouldn't push it.
 
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