Rewiring out of country 220v to US 120v

Reply

  #1  
Old 10-04-14, 07:23 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 51
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Rewiring out of country 220v to US 120v

1. take a look at the photo below of my breaker. That breaker is wired to 1 4-set of sockets that are never used. it states on the breaker, 120/240v What does this mean? is it wired for either or, or it simply has the ability to be wired for whichever one a person chooses?

2. My plug(pictured below), please tell me what kind of plug this is(what country it's from). I thought it was a chinese plug???

3. The plug is a 220v plug that powers a 2300w machine. Would there be anyway to convert this plug to a North American 120V plugin that I can then use with that set of sockets on that red 20a breaker(I believe that the sockets are 120v sockets)?


Here is a photo of the 120v switch, that is ran to ONE set of outlets(4 outlets in the same outlet box)

Name:  IMG_0046.jpg
Views: 6326
Size:  29.6 KB




Heres pics of the cord for my machine
Machine can be seen here: Infrared IR BGA Rework Station Scotle IR6000 V4 CE Upgrade from Achi IR6000 Hot | eBay

Name:  IMG_0041.jpg
Views: 6449
Size:  31.1 KB
Name:  IMG_0042.jpg
Views: 6297
Size:  36.0 KB
Name:  IMG_0043.jpg
Views: 6220
Size:  25.1 KB
Name:  IMG_0044.jpg
Views: 6249
Size:  29.2 KB
Name:  IMG_0045.jpg
Views: 6173
Size:  31.0 KB
 

Last edited by yum114; 10-04-14 at 08:03 PM.
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 10-04-14, 07:41 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,597
Received 13 Votes on 11 Posts
Tinypic can not be used for images. Photobucket or Image shack can be used or you can insert them from your computer. http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...your-post.html

The problem isn't just voltage it is frequency. The machine seems to have motors and if the motors are 50Hz they will not run correctly if at all on US 60hz unless they are universal motors.
 
  #3  
Old 10-04-14, 08:02 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 51
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Im certain many users use this machine in the US, but they are using them on 220v. So, other than the hertz thing, there would be no problem rewiring that power cord for a 110v socket?


sidenote: anyway to see posts from oldest to newest instead of newest to oldest?
 
  #4  
Old 10-04-14, 08:32 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,597
Received 13 Votes on 11 Posts
Except that you don't have 110 volts in the US. You have 120 volts and if it is a single phase power supply 240 volts.
there would be no problem rewiring that power cord for a 110v socket?
But it won't operate on 120 volts so why would you.
Im certain many users use this machine in the US,
Yes but they are machines built to work in the US.
anyway to see posts from oldest to newest instead of newest to oldest
At the top: Forum Actions > General settings.

Name:  SC89.jpg
Views: 5788
Size:  32.2 KB
 
  #5  
Old 10-04-14, 08:39 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 51
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
They dont make this machine for US plug. So everyone in the US using this machine is doing so with a machine meant for asian/european 220v.

and when I said 110, I meant 120. so any way to wire this 220v pplug for a 120v outlet?
thx for help with thread settings
 
  #6  
Old 10-04-14, 08:40 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,597
Received 13 Votes on 11 Posts
A 220 device will not work on 120 volts. You would need a transformer rated for the required amps. It would probably be best to use a buck and boost transformer on 240v and lower the voltage to 220 or ask the manufacturer if it will work on 240..
 

Last edited by ray2047; 10-04-14 at 09:08 PM.
  #7  
Old 10-04-14, 09:51 PM
Member
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 1,430
Received 14 Votes on 12 Posts
This is the second thread asked about this. European style(???) plug device in America - DoItYourself.com Community Forums

Specs show AC220Vą10%/AC110Vą10% 50/60Hz so should work on standard US [email protected]

The power draw (2400W) is too high for any standard 120v 20amp circuit even with a transformer so do need to run a 2 wire plus ground circuit from the panel. A 6-15R outlet using 14 gauge on 15amp two pole breaker should suffice.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 10-05-14 at 06:41 AM. Reason: Change "4-wire" to "2-wire plus ground"..
  #8  
Old 10-05-14, 12:50 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 51
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
thx
Ok, so I was going to get started on setting up this outlet tonight. Went to Lowes to get the final pieces to the puzzle and walked away with nothing smh.
BUT, I did come away with some questions if anyone wouldn't mind helping :-)

1. What is the difference between this double pole 240v breaker and the normal ones? From the photo you may not be able to tell, but this breaker only takes up 1 slot in the breaker box. As you know, most double pole 240v breakers take up 2 slots, while this one only takes up one. any drawbacks to using something like this?
EDIT: After doing some research, and finding out that these are typically called "tandem" breakers. I was able to further search on the topic and have found out that NO, these are NOT for being able to create 220/240v from a single 1inch slot in the panel. DO NOT TRY IT!
Name:  IMG_0047.jpg
Views: 5905
Size:  17.9 KB
Name:  IMG_0048.jpg
Views: 5824
Size:  24.1 KB




2. Which of these should I go for? As you can see, one is MUCH smaller than the other, and I can't quite understand why as they are both rated 20amp 240v and have the same layout. just the plugs would be bigger for one of the outlets and smaller for the other
Name:  IMG_0050.jpg
Views: 6980
Size:  42.5 KB
Name:  IMG_0049.jpg
Views: 6001
Size:  42.0 KB



3. Best size wiring for 15amp and best size for 20amp? Not sure which I amp breaker I will go with until I can find a socket, and a plug to rewire the machines current power cord. But, 12/2 gauge romex would work at both 15/20 amps, right?
 

Last edited by yum114; 10-05-14 at 01:10 AM.
  #9  
Old 10-05-14, 06:28 AM
Tolyn Ironhand's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Twin Cities, MN
Posts: 13,022
Received 68 Votes on 60 Posts
They are not. The large black receptacle (outlet) is a 6-30R 30 amp, 240 volt. You want to use the white one. Note below that the 15/20 look the same, but they are not.

Name:  Nema chart.jpg
Views: 34106
Size:  52.3 KB

A 15 amp circuit requires 14 ga wire, 20 amp circuit requires 20 ga wire. I recommend installing 12/2 and using a 20 amp breaker.
 
  #10  
Old 10-05-14, 07:02 AM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,597
Received 13 Votes on 11 Posts
What is the difference between this double pole 240v breaker and the normal ones?
2-pole, single pole and and tandem breakers are all normal breakers.
  • Two pole breaker connect to both legs of the 240.
  • Single pole connects to one leg of the 240 (Provides 120 volt when used with neutral as second leg).
  • A tandem is two single pole breakers in the space of one single pole breaker. both breakers connect to the same leg of the 240 so can not be used for 240.
Note there are some variations with some brands of panel such as GE.

You need a Nema 6-20r as Toyln wrote.

Name:  1876.jpg
Views: 5655
Size:  15.8 KB
Source: Frentz and Son Hardware

Name:  5466-x.jpg
Views: 5694
Size:  16.3 KB
Source International Configurations

Note a NEMA 6-15 plug will also fit a 6-20 receptacle but you want a NEMA 6-20 plug.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 10-05-14 at 09:18 AM.
  #11  
Old 10-05-14, 08:07 AM
CasualJoe's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 10,235
Received 39 Votes on 31 Posts
In addition to what has already been stated:

You haven't shown us a complete picture of your existing electric panel, but assuming it is a Westinghouse panel, based upon the red handled breaker picture you showed us, the new tandem breaker (either Siemens or Murray) shouldn't be used anyway. I am nearly 100% certain it would not be U.L. Listed for use in your panel. There should be a label inside your panel that provides the manufacturer's name and breaker types that are acceptable for use in that panel. If it is an older Westinghouse panel, you would want a Cutler-Hammer BR series breaker.
 
  #12  
Old 10-05-14, 12:31 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 51
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
You all have been amazingly helpful.
One last question though.
If the workstation that I am using, max load is only 11amps. Why do I need to rewire a plugin that is 20amps rated?
Homedepot only has the nema 6-15 plugins, would that truly not suffice?
 
  #13  
Old 10-05-14, 12:55 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,597
Received 13 Votes on 11 Posts
It's best to use 80% of the breaker capacity or less. (15x80%=12) What's a a plugin? Do you mean receptacle. Did you look yourself or take the word of an employee? Try a hardware store or electric supply house if they don't have it. http://www.homedepot.com/p/Leviton-2...-0WS/100356999
 
  #14  
Old 10-05-14, 01:03 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 51
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
So 80% x 11 would still be less than 15, so shouldn't the 15amp plug suffice?
I don't mean recepticle. the receptacle will be 20 amps like the breaker. but I have to rewire my machines power cord(since it isn't american) so I am going to be rewiring it to a 15amp plug
Pass & Seymour 15-Amp 250-Volt NEMA 6-15P Industrial-Grade Plug-PS5666XCCV4 at The Home Depot

and by the way, I looked myself :-)
 
  #15  
Old 10-05-14, 01:48 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,597
Received 13 Votes on 11 Posts
The receptacle will take either a 15 amp or 20 amp plug. Yes you can go with the 15 amp plug. Just monitor it occasionally to see how warm it is getting.

Was the 80%x11 a typo in your post?
 
  #16  
Old 10-05-14, 02:48 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 51
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Kind of a typo. I meant 11x80%
we were making sure to stay under the 80% of max amperage right?
Well, the device is rated 11amps(which it never really reaches. but that multiplied by the 80% rule, would be less than 15amps, so I should be safe :-)
Thank you all for your amazing help, and putting up with all of my questions!
 
  #17  
Old 10-05-14, 03:13 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,597
Received 13 Votes on 11 Posts
No 80% of the circuit so if you used a 15 amp breaker it would be 15x80%=12.
 
  #18  
Old 10-05-14, 04:14 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 51
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thx to all of your help, I think I'm ready to get started!
Name:  2ze9zt4.jpg
Views: 6128
Size:  38.7 KB
 
  #19  
Old 10-05-14, 06:05 PM
Justin Smith's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Cressona, Pa, USA
Posts: 2,546
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Don't forget your connectors where your Romex enters the panel and outlet box.
 
  #20  
Old 10-05-14, 06:22 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 51
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Oh shoot, Justin, you're right! Also, what is the best way to keep everything OUTSIDE of the wall? I've seen people with breaker boxes where there was a cord coming out of a hole in the breaker box, on the outside of the wall, and ran straight to the surface mount outlet. Nothing was behind the wall.
 
  #21  
Old 10-05-14, 07:53 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 51
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
How do I rewire my new plugin to my old one?
How do I find out which colors go to which spots?

Original plug spliced
Name:  my cord split.jpg
Views: 6034
Size:  21.5 KB

new plug
Name:  My cord new plugin.jpg
Views: 9379
Size:  12.3 KB
 
  #22  
Old 10-05-14, 08:08 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 54,219
Received 477 Votes on 447 Posts
The green wire goes to the center screw for the U pin.
The other two colors do not make a difference.
 
  #23  
Old 10-05-14, 08:17 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,597
Received 13 Votes on 11 Posts
what is the best way to keep everything OUTSIDE of the wall? I've seen people with breaker boxes where there was a cord coming out of a hole in the breaker box, on the outside of the wall, and ran straight to the surface mount outlet.
That is a code violation. You can run in the wall or use conduit. You could also use surface raceway (such as Wiremold). Best in surface raceway to use individual conductors.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: