push in wire connectors - stranded wire?

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Old 10-08-14, 09:47 AM
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push in wire connectors - stranded wire?

These push in connectors seem to be rated differently for stranded wire?
Tool Review: Ideal In-Sure™ Push-In Wire Connectors « Home Improvement Stack Exchange Blog

How do they deal with stranded wire?
 
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Old 10-08-14, 10:21 AM
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What do you mean how do they deal with stranded wire? If the connector is listed for use with stranded wires you can use stranded, if not you are restricted to solid.
 

Last edited by pcboss; 10-08-14 at 02:02 PM.
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Old 10-08-14, 10:28 AM
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http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y63...backstab01.jpg

What leads us to believe the splices are better than backstabs, which are also UL recognized? You have a high area low force contact held by a low area high force contact with the wire in the middle. I use them for can lights, and other low current apps.
 
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Old 10-08-14, 12:50 PM
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Do you have an older home? Those ideals aren't listed to be used with TW wire or other 60c wire....
 
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Old 10-08-14, 12:57 PM
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It's NMD 90 cable for this particular connection. In fact all the wiring in the house is NM I think.
 
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Old 10-08-14, 01:30 PM
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That's a red flag. Thus saying it is likely to cause conductor heating at the connection.
 
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Old 10-08-14, 01:32 PM
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I read a comment like this:
The problem with these connectors is the small surface area that contacts the conductor. Over time, with conductor oxidization, a high impedance connection is created. this heats up the connector, and it fails
Surely the connection point is just as small in a wire nut?
 
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Old 10-08-14, 01:56 PM
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No, not the same. Wire nuts create significant pressure over a significant surface area. Both gas tight to reduce oxidation and the large contact area reduces current density. The wire nut itself contains conductive metal to also aid current flow. You can hold two #12 stripped ends together by hand and get some conduction, but give it time, and that will fail.
 
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Old 10-08-14, 07:23 PM
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How do they deal with stranded wire?
Don't believe everything you read on a blog without checking the manufacturer's specs. The In-Sure connectors accept #12 stranded,no problem.

Look at page 15 in the Ideal catalog.

http://www.idealind.com/media/pdfs/c...or_catalog.pdf
 
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Old 10-09-14, 05:24 AM
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So is the connection point too small in these connectors or are they just fine?
 
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Old 10-09-14, 05:47 AM
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So is the connection point too small in these connectors or are they just fine?
They are both U.L. and CSA Listed.
 
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Old 10-09-14, 05:48 AM
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I have/found them to be reliable. The contact area/is/different than a/ backstab on a device.
 
 

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