Scab off unused 20 amp outlet

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  #1  
Old 10-10-14, 12:55 PM
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Scab off unused 20 amp outlet

Hi everyone,

I am wondering what the correct thing to do is in this scenario:

There is a 20 amp breaker that is only feeding a double duplex outlet right below the main service panel. This outlet is rarely ever used so I wanted to scab off power and send it 35 feet into my room.

I have a 650 watt computer along with a couple servers (500 watts total), a gaming system, lights, a portable fan and LCD TV in my room so I'm looking at approximately 1500 watts when everything is going.

Would it be best to change the double duplex outlet by the main service panel into a single 20 amp duplex outlet with 12/2 wire from the panel and then run 12/2 wire from the single 20 amp duplex outlet to another 20 amp duplex outlet in my room (35 feet away) since I will be using an 1800 watt surge protector and have everything plugged into that.

Any thoughts or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you in advance!
 
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  #2  
Old 10-10-14, 12:59 PM
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Does your local jurisdiction require AFCI protection in a bedroom? If so then change one duplex receptacle to a blank face AFCI and use use it to feed the bedroom. If the breaker is GFCI change to a non GFCI and change the other receptacle to GFCI.

AFCI example: http://www.leviton.com/OA_HTML/Secti...minisite=10251
 
  #3  
Old 10-10-14, 01:01 PM
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For the same amount of work you could have a new circuit installed for your room and leave the one at the panel alone.

There is no advantage to making a change to the receptacles at the panel.
 
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Old 10-10-14, 01:15 PM
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^^^ What pcboss said. We're talking a couple extra feet of wire and a new breaker just to run a new circuit.
And I have no idea if the NEC requires a dedicated service receptacle at your panel, but you might need that receptacle there.
 
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Old 10-10-14, 01:21 PM
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Would it be best to change the double duplex outlet by the main service panel into a single 20 amp duplex outlet
Welcome.
Ray and pcboss have this covered. I just wanted to comment that removing one receptacle from a group of two (or more) will in no way provide more power to anywhere you may wish to extend it.

(this is of course if outlets are not in use)
 
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Old 10-10-14, 02:45 PM
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Thank you all for your quick responses. It is very much appreciated

The reason I was going to go the route that I mentioned in my original post is because this service panel (an ITE Imperial) was installed in '77 (according to the signature by the electrician in the panel) and I don't see a main shut off for the panel. And of course the panel is completely full.

I like the idea that Ray2047 mentioned since I'd rather just spend the extra money on some parts and be extra safe. It would be best to just have another circuit and run that into the bedroom but with no slots for another breaker, I don't think I have any other choice.

Any other thoughts before I go the route that Ray2047 recommended?

Thanks again for all the help so far!
 
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Old 10-10-14, 03:30 PM
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You are not going to find an AFCI breaker for a panel that old.
 
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Old 10-10-14, 03:38 PM
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Hi pcboss,

Since the breaker in the panel is non-GFCI, I was going take out the double duplex outlet that is being fed by the 20 amp breaker and install a GFCI outlet on one side and then put in the blank AFCI outlet right next to it and run 12/2 from the AFCI outlet to my bedroom.

Would this be correct?
 
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Old 10-10-14, 04:16 PM
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Yes, that would be correct. PCBoss and I posted at the same time and I don't believe he saw my post.
 
  #10  
Old 10-10-14, 06:56 PM
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Alright sounds good! Thank you all very much for your quick and in-depth responses. Very much appreciated
 
  #11  
Old 10-10-14, 09:48 PM
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You are not consuming anywhere near to maximum load for the existing circuit. For example, your computer is not consuming anywhere near to 650 watts. Is it so hot as to also toast bread? Of course not. Many computer assembler built systems have power supplies at least double the required and consumed wattage.

At most, that computer is consuming 300 watts - often much less. If in doubt, then do what is always necessary to know something. Measure it. A highly regarded tool for layman to do just that is called a Kill-A-Watt. Maybe $20 to measure things you did not even know you should know.
 
  #12  
Old 10-12-14, 06:49 PM
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unless the panel is a ITE pushmatic, the AFCI breakers manufactured by Siemens are a direct replacement for this panel if he is looking for AFCI protection.
 
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