Wiring kitchen counter outlets

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Old 10-11-14, 01:14 PM
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Wiring kitchen counter outlets

I'm in the process of remodeling my kitchen and need to do some rewiring. I understand that the fridge, stove, dishwasher and microwave oven all need to be on dedicated circuits with the proper sized wire and breaker for each.

I'm not sure how I should wire the electrical outlets above the kitchen counter.

I made a drawing of my kitchen. The pale blue is the counter top area and the red squares are electrical outlets. I want to have four electrical outlets above the counters. The two outlets at the bottom of the picture are in the dining area and won't be touched for now.

My understanding is that I must have two separate 20 amp circuits for these outlets, and that each circuit should be protected by a GFCI plug.

I live in Canada.
 
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Old 10-11-14, 01:25 PM
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Counter Top Receptacles

Two 20 amp circuits are required per NEC.

What is your maximum distance between receptacles measured along the wall?
 
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Old 10-11-14, 01:33 PM
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3 feet between the outlets above the dishwasher.

4.5 feet between the outlets to the left and right of the stove.
 
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Old 10-11-14, 01:40 PM
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Stick with Wirepuller, I just wanted to add 2 cents.
Range/Stove doesn't require own circuit if gas.

You will have to move/add counter top outlets to meet U.S. Code 4' Rule.
 
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Old 10-11-14, 01:57 PM
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The OP is in Canada. The NEC rules do not apply.
 
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Old 10-11-14, 02:04 PM
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Yes, I see.
I'll let someone familiar with Canada code go at it.
 
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Old 10-11-14, 02:06 PM
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Maybe Mr. Awesome will drop by.
 
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Old 10-11-14, 02:12 PM
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I hope so.... I get a kick out of the name and picture. And knowledge doesn't hurt.
 
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Old 10-11-14, 05:23 PM
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For your countertop circuits, you can have 20A circuits with no more than 2 receptacles per circuit, or you can install 15A split receptacles with no more than 2 per circuit. Your choice, but anything within 1.5m of the sink needs to be GFCI protected, so the 20A circuits are the way to go IMO.
For your spacing on the counters... Every 900mm should have a receptacle, except behind the sink. So just measure 900mm from the left of the sink, 900mm from the right, and go from there. You can move your receptacles a little closer to the sink to make the spacing look better if you wish.
Islands need a receptacle, as do cut off counter surfaces like yours in the bottom left of your picture.
All receptacles except for the fridge and microwave need to be tamper resistant.
So all in all your drawing looks good, except you may need to add 2 more receptacles to the top of your drawing (left and right of the sink).

side note: Gas stoves still require a receptacle within 130mm of the floor centered or as close to center in the space for the stove.
 
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Old 10-14-14, 09:10 PM
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Picture #1 is a scale drawing with the measurements I took to get an estimate for a granite counter. There is a window above the sink.

Picture #2 is how I think the electrical outlets should be located based on Mr. Awesome's inputs.

Since I should have outlets no less than 900 mm from both sides of the sink I thought I would put them approximately halfway between the edges of the window and the adjoining walls. On the left hand side of the sink I would probably go as far as the 900 mm threshold allows. Too close to the window trim might leave an ugly reveal. The right hand side of the sink is a little closer to the wall and I could put the outlet dead center.

On the right side wall I drew brown squares with X's thru them to indicate where the studs are located and red squares next to the studs where I would locate my electrical boxes. The framing isn't spaced very evenly so I didn't bother trying to draw it to scale but the measurements between the boxes are accurate.

The wall behind the stove is also an exterior wall. On the exterior walls I can see only black sheathing covered with furring strips. It's a brick exterior built in the mid 1960's. The existing electrical boxes on the stove wall are very shallow, only 1.5" deep. It appears a hole was cut into the sheathing and they were nailed to whatever is behind there.
 
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Old 10-15-14, 01:08 PM
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Looking good.
You misunderstood me though, You can bring your receptacles directly beside the left and right hand sides of the sink if you wish, you just can't place them behind or in front of the sink. Your placement looks nice and the corners will likely be where appliances get plugged in so I would roll with it, but just for future knowledge you could bring them closer as long as the next one is within 900mm. You have some wiggle room with the receptacles on the right if you would like to move them over a bit. You don't need to place the boxes directly on a stud. If your walls are open, you could use a box bracket, 4x4 box, and 1/2'' mud ring.
http://www.rm-electrical.com/publish...ng-Bracket.jpg
http://www.homedepot.com/catalog/pro...f7f85f_400.jpg

If your walls are closed, you can use a rework box or a 2104-lu box with f clips to float the box between the studs.
http://hi.atgimg.com/img/x/14657/622538414403_ca.jpg
https://media.nedco.ca/shopimages/ca...5042949150.jpg
http://www.ujr.ca/EN/4203200.jpg

Your first two receptacles on the left and right of your sink will need protection. Use a GFCI as the first receptacle on either side and then wire the next receptacle off of the load side on the GFCI. The other two do not need protection.
If the receptacle above the cut off part of the counter is existing, you can leave it alone. Anything existing can be left as a 15A receptacle, but anything you are adding must be 20A or 15A split.
I neglected to mention that any boxes on exterior walls need a vapor barrier installed.
http://jim-graham.net/jag_blog/wp-co...lectrical2.jpg
 
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Old 03-14-15, 01:21 PM
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There's also an eating area at the bottom of the picture. I want to put a 20 amp circuit but I don't know if it's supposed to be arc or ground fault?
 
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Old 03-14-15, 03:57 PM
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By eating area do you mean an open dining room?
20A general receptacle circuits are acceptable but cannot have any lights on the circuit, receptacles only.
GFCI protection is not necessary there.
I'm not sure which province you are from, but you would need to look into whether or not your province has adopted the 2015 CEC which requires arc fault protection on every receptacle circuit except for sump pumps. If you're still on the 2012 CEC, you can use regular breakers and receptacles.
You can protect your circuit with an arc fault breaker, or an arc fault receptacle so long as it is the first device in line.
 
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Old 03-14-15, 06:21 PM
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We're in Quebec. It's a big kitchen with a dining area. We sometimes use the outlet to plug in a raclette.
 
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Old 03-14-15, 06:34 PM
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That would just be a general use receptacle. You could install that circuit with a regular breaker and receptacle for now and just change out either the breaker or first receptacle if you find out you need arc fault protection.
 
 

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