Dryers and AC frequency


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Old 10-18-14, 03:05 PM
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Dryers and AC frequency

Hi all!

This is my first post on the forums but I'm sure I'll have many more.

A friend of mine brought a gas dryer back from the US but it doesn't fit in his apartment. I have the space and would love to buy it the one thing I'm worried about is the electric connection.

The dryer was designed for 220v 60hz and the line frequency here is 50hz.

Is this a problem? I'm guessing the electricity is just used to turn the drum since the heating is gas, I'm assuming this is done by an AC motor which, if I remember high school science class right, will turn slower at 50 than at 60.

It's a nice dryer and the price is great but if it's going to break in a year, I'd rather pass.
 
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Old 10-18-14, 03:15 PM
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The dryer was designed for 220v 60hz
That would be very unusual, especially for a gas dryer. The motor and controls are 120 volts on 99% of all North American dryers. The dryers are rated 120/240 not 220. It almost certainly can not be used on 220 volts.
but if it's going to break in a year, I'd rather pass.
It will burn up in a few minutes at most if operated at 220 volts n if it requires a 120/240 power supply. Give us the make and model number.
 
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Old 10-18-14, 03:17 PM
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Thread moved to Electrical forum.
 
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Old 10-18-14, 03:23 PM
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The panel on the back of the dryer says it runs on 208-240v 60hz. I have 220 volt current in most of my outlets here but its 50hz.
 
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Old 10-18-14, 04:22 PM
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That is very unusual for a North American dryer. What is the make and model number.
 
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Old 10-18-14, 04:25 PM
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NO... you cannot use an American appliance overseas. Our appliances run on 120/240vac. In our electric dryers..... only the heat element runs on 220-240vac. All the electronics, the timer and the motor run on 120vac.

The 50hz vs. 60hz will also be a problem as the timer will not keep correct time and the motor won't turn at the correct speed.
 
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Old 10-18-14, 04:27 PM
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have never seen 240 volt gas dryer in US. Always could be something I haven't seen.
 
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Old 10-19-14, 11:57 AM
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Give us the full model number and we can give you the correct answer. If it's a 60hz motor, it will run 20% slower and run hotter and have less torque. May not be that big of an issue, but you will definitely burn that motor up it it's a 120vac motor.
 
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Old 10-24-14, 05:14 AM
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Ok you guys were right. The other day I actually went over to check out the dryer in person. It was originally 120 but my friend had it converted to 220 which is why he told me it was 220. The conversion is just a transformer neatly tucked inside the frame. He turned it on and it worked fine.

My question I guess is still the same, is the 50 vs 60 going to make a difference in the longevity of the dryer? Or should I not worry.
 
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Old 10-24-14, 07:49 AM
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If he is giving it to you it is a good deal otherwise I'd not take it. Just no way to be sure how long the motor will last unless on the motor it says 50-60 Hz.
 
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Old 10-25-14, 02:51 AM
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Running a 50 HZ motor on 60 HZ tends to work better than the opposite.
On the other hand, many US made motors are oversized, and will make it.
When it is converted to 220 in addition this will be even one more unsecure point.

It should have been a nearly free thin if I would have tried, and then maybe mot of the interest of proving its possible, or maybe not...

Conclusion: I would not dare to recommend it, but I might have tried it myselves knowing it could be failing.

dsk
 
 

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