Baseboard heater does not shut itself off


  #1  
Old 10-22-14, 12:03 PM
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Baseboard heater does not shut itself off

I installed a new baseboard heater in my daughter's apt.
Little issue with power and the display going blank, but that seemed to be resolved with some help here (thank you).

Today, the heaters kick in at 19.5 degrees C or 67 degrees F, but they do not shut off, at all. I had to turn the thermostat down to 45 degrees f to get to disengage. The room was well above the temp displayed on the Thermostat. The plaster wall was so hot I could not touch it with a bare hand, my digital thermometer read 144.7 degrees on the plaster surface about 6 inches above the heater.

I did not install the thermostats, could it be the load is too high for the thermostat? Each thermostat is rated for up to 2000 watts, so it should be ok.

There are 2 1500 watt heaters on a 20 amp 240 line with each heater having its own thermostat.

Any suggestions?
 

Last edited by Kiton; 10-22-14 at 12:35 PM. Reason: info added
  #2  
Old 10-22-14, 12:26 PM
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If the temperature at the T-stat was not satisfied it will not shutoff. Is the T-stat wall or unit mounted?
 
  #3  
Old 10-22-14, 12:34 PM
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It is a wall mounted unit. A basic on/off type, not a programmable.
There are 4 of these that were installed and only one gives her trouble. It is the one at the end of the stream.

The room was very warm, well above the 19 degrees the thermostat was set to.

My daughter just told me the issue predates the new thermostats, she asked her cousin to switch the units because of this issue.





AUBE - Non-Programmable Thermostat | Réno-Dépôt
 
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Old 10-22-14, 07:12 PM
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That's a basic two wire high voltage thermostat. Since it's only two wires it opens and closes one of the legs of the 240vac line. You appear to be using it correctly.

It almost sounds like it's a defective thermostat but I don't think so. Baseboard heaters have thermal safety switches built in to them to keep the unit from overheating and it sounds like yours is overheating. I think you may have a shorted element. If the element was shorted to ground then the thermostat could not operate it correctly and that short could bypass the safety switch.

I'd recommend temporarily taking the unit out of service.
Turn the power to the heater off.
Remove the heater covers and disconnect the single wire at each end of the heater that goes to the element. Use an ohmmeter to check for continuity (a short) between the wire at each end and the metal heating element tube.
 
  #5  
Old 10-23-14, 07:02 AM
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Thank you PJMax,

I will check that tonight after work.
Forgive my ignorance of how this works, but can I use a length of say, 14-2 wired to the end of the Thermostat to baseboard heater leg to check for a break or small fracture in that leg of the line?

But I did get 240 volts across the red and black at the heater when I checked a few days ago, so I assumed that leg was fine and in order.

The run goes from the breaker, to the bathroom heater (which is almost never used)

Then on to front left room, ties line to 1 load, (the heater) and line forward that goes on to the Thermostat in front room, right, end of stream and room with issue.

The three reds are tied together,
two blacks tied with a jumper black to the thermostat.
The Load black goes to the thermostat.
 
  #6  
Old 10-23-14, 08:26 AM
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The room was very warm, well above the 19 degrees the thermostat was set to.

My daughter just told me the issue predates the new thermostats, she asked her cousin to switch the units because of this issue.

If the old thermostat did the same thing I would look at the thermostat location. Is it located on an uninsulated outside wall? Is the temperature of the wall surface much cooler than the desired room temperature?
 
 

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