Can someone help me with this layout?

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  #1  
Old 10-26-14, 03:38 PM
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Question Can someone help me with this layout?

I'm in the process of refinishing my basement and it's time to start straightening out the electricity. I am putting in all new breakers to separate everything from the upstairs.

I have attached a diagram of how I want it all layed out but am not sure what needs/should be daisy chained or on its own separate circuit.Any suggestions are welcome.

PS. I already have the 20amp wire thats why I'm going 20amp all around and not 15amp.

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Last edited by rufunky; 10-26-14 at 04:20 PM.
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  #2  
Old 10-26-14, 07:08 PM
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It's not clear if the diagram is the basement only or not. Assuming that it is, electrical code requires that the bathroom be on it's own circuit. It's probably the same with the kitchen, especially the stove, microwave & the fridge. Here in NY, the entire thing would be illegal but that's another story.
 
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Old 10-26-14, 07:23 PM
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Yes, this is the Basement only.

So I'm thinking:

Bathroom receptacle 1 circuit
Kitchen receptacles 1 circuit
Rooms 1,2 and 5 receptacles 1 circuit
Rooms 1 and 2 lights 1 circuit
Rooms 3,4 and 5 lights 1 circuit

Does that sound right or am I using way to many circuits? BTW all the lights are LED 9wt
 
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Old 10-26-14, 07:54 PM
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I don't think that you are using too many circuits. Some people would also separate lights from receptacles, in the other rooms.
 
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Old 10-26-14, 08:15 PM
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Kitchen must have two 20 amp receptacle circuits. Lights or other loads like garbage disposal can not be on the kitchen SAB receptacle circuits.
 
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Old 10-26-14, 08:31 PM
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Oh OK, so how does this sound?

Bathroom receptacle 1 circuit
Kitchen receptacles 2 circuits
Rooms 1,2 and 5 receptacles 1 circuit
Rooms 1 and 2 lights 1 circuit
Rooms 3,4 and 5 lights 1 circuit
 
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Old 10-26-14, 09:14 PM
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One circuit can cover the lighting for all the rooms.
 
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Old 10-27-14, 05:56 AM
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What version of the NEC are you under. GFCI and AFCI requirements may apply depending on what version you are under.

Room 5 appears to be a utility room with washer, dryer and furnace. I would provide a 20A dedicated circuit to both the washer and furnace (assuming furnace is gas). If the dryer is electric, it will need a 120/240 volt 30A circuit. If the dryer is gas it can plug into the washer receptacle. 15A devices will be fine or the 120 volt circuits.
 
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Old 10-27-14, 07:29 PM
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Correct, Room 5 is the utility room. I already ran an 120v 30A circuit for the electric dryer when I converted from gas ( forgot to put that in the diagram).

I will run another for the washing machine which is currently on the opposite side of the floor plan currently.

I'm not sure how the gas furnace is setup now but I believe it may be on its own circuit, I'll have to double check.

Excuse my ignorance but I am not sure what NEC is.
 
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Old 10-27-14, 07:45 PM
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NEC is the national electrical code.

The dryer if electric needs a 30 amp 120/240 circuit, not a 120 circuit. If gas it can share the 20 amp circuit for the washer.
 
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Old 10-27-14, 07:54 PM
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I am not sure what version of the National electric code I fall under. I am in Boston Ma if that tells you anything.
 
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Old 10-27-14, 09:19 PM
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I believe Mass has strict rules about who can pull permits and do electrical work. I would call to see if you can even do this work.
 
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Old 10-28-14, 01:43 PM
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2014 NEC, most towns will allow DYI after pulling a permit, don't forget the smoke detection devices.
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Old 10-28-14, 04:12 PM
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Even if that's true, most cities/towns don't allow bedrooms, in the basement/cellar. I certainly wouldn't call the building dept. about that job.
 
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Old 10-28-14, 05:43 PM
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I believe if you have adequate egress through correct window openings it may pass,that is a building code issue.
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  #16  
Old 10-28-14, 06:01 PM
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The floor plan has already been brought to city hall and approved.The plan did not have a bed in it but I am not enclosing a sleeping area and I have two forms of egress in case of emergency.
 
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