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Need to build rotating "stage". Need help identifying a few things.

Need to build rotating "stage". Need help identifying a few things.

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  #1  
Old 10-26-14, 08:44 PM
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Need to build rotating "stage". Need help identifying a few things.

I need to build something just like this, except with an 8 foot diameter, with furniture and people on top of it.

I am having problems figuring out what size/strength/model of motor and gearbox I would need, and where I might find them for sale.

I also need to keep it as low profile (above ground) as I possibly can.

I also have no idea of what that thing is he is using for the spindle.

Any ideas?
Thanks!
 
  #2  
Old 10-27-14, 06:25 AM
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You are going to have to provide a lot more details or at least come up with some kind of design before you can start asking specifics about motor size and how to drive it. Will people be on this "stage". will the load on top be centered, off center or moving around? How low to the ground does it need to be? How heavy will the platform be including the load on top? How fast does it need to turn? Do you need to vary it's speed or gently start and stop it?
 
  #3  
Old 10-27-14, 08:13 AM
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It should be roughly 6-7ish inches tall, the lower the better. Needs to be about the size of a step, although, it will be surrounded by a rise, so a few inches more won't hurt. I would prefer it to be flush with the rise, but it won't bother me if it's not, as it would just be another step up. It will have an 8' diameter.

For the top, I am planning on using a few sheets of finished plywood with a ribbed structure sandwiched between for reinforcement, or if the plywood turns out to be strong enough to support it without warping, I will just stop at that.

The underside will be covered in a few rows of casters for most of the support.

The platform will have a circular wood sofa, a few ottomans, and generally 1-4 people sitting on it.

Probably looking at max load of about 2K lbs. If that.

It definitely needs to rotate fairly slow, and easing in and out would be ideal, but not necessarily mandatory. Would certainly be nice to be able to connect it with a simple forward/backward remote. It would also not be a continuous spin. It would be something that might be used every now and then.

I am not looking to spend more than $400-$600 tops on motor/gearbox/anything else needed to make this thing motorized.

The motorized element of it would just be an embellishment, so budget is most important. If I cannot accomplish what I need for under $600 (and that is pushing it), I will just bolt a heavy duty spindle on it and call it a day.
 
  #4  
Old 10-27-14, 09:05 AM
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How long does it need to last and how long will it be running when it is used?

There are surplus sites that sell used or new, old stock motors and gear motors that would be a good place to start. I would look for something with a high reduction ratio that would give you a slow rotation speed.

Driving the platform can be done a couple ways. You can drive the center spindle axle but I think you're getting big enough that the torque required in the center would require some large components to handle the load. You can have a rubber tire pushing up on the platform or use it as one of your support rollers for drive. Another option is to wrap a roller chain around the perimeter or the perimeter of something mounted on the bottom side. Then drive the chain with a sprocket on the motor shaft.

You can use a center spindle if you want but it purpose sorta changes as the diameter increases. At bigger sizes it can be used simply to keep the platform centered. At some point a center spindle is probably more trouble than it's worth and you can guide the platform from rollers further away from the center.
 
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Old 10-27-14, 11:42 AM
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The purpose for this is to utilize the space I have for a lounge/home movie theater. One side of the room will have a bar and fireplace, and the opposite side will have a movie screen. For optimal viewing/acoustics for the theater, I need central seating, but with a bar and fireplace on the opposite wall, forward facing permanent seating for the theater is not an option. I also don't want to have to drag a sofa around the room every time I have guests over, or want to sit facing the fireplace.

So, the solution I thought of, is to build a room centered, rotating, circular platform, with a circular sofa on it, which can be rotated facing one direction for the theater, and one direction for the "lounge" area.

It will most likely not be rotated very often, but I figured if I am going to have a room centered, rotating platform, it would be nice to motorize it if possible. But, if I am going to have to sink upward of a thousand dollars or so to do it, then it's not worth it.

Since I am not willing to spend $10,000 to have a pro come and install a rotating platform, I am planning on a DIY project. I just need to figure out the best possible solution, and price.

I am afraid of the rotating tire idea. I feel like there would not be enough grip, and it would just slip a lot. I do like the chain/sprocket idea though, I just need to find an affordable attachment chain for the job. Unfortunately, I seem to be facing the same problem I was with motors and gearboxes, where the only place I can find them seem to be industrial suppliers who's prices seem to range from $15 for 5 links to "Call us for prices!! lol"
 
  #6  
Old 10-27-14, 01:14 PM
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Good reason!

I would follow the design using the casters/wheels but forego the motor and gearbox. This will not be difficult to turn by hand and then make a drop-in pin to lock it in position.
 
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Old 10-27-14, 01:53 PM
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Motorizing it would be overkill. Harbor freight sells many different castors. If you only rotate one direction fixed castors would work. be sure to put a pivot point in center or you will chase platform all over place.Bigger castors usually easier to move.
 
  #8  
Old 10-27-14, 04:23 PM
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If you don't have to rotate it often I would float the platform on a cushion of air like a hovercraft. Have an inlet where you can hook the output from a shop vac to pump air below your movable section. Turn on the air and just shove it to wherever you want and turn off the air and let it settle back in place.
 
  #9  
Old 10-27-14, 04:40 PM
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Good idea, Pilot except I don't think a shop vacuum (on blow) will have enough pressure/flow to lift an eight foot diameter pad with furniture.

I could be wrong, I've been wrong before.
 
  #10  
Old 10-28-14, 07:05 AM
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The size of the pad actually helps. When you divide out the weight over that large an area it takes very little pressure to support it.

A 8' diameter circle has an area of 7'238 square inches. 2'000 pounds over that large an area needs only 1/4 psi (.28 psi) to support the load. Any more than that and it's floating. My shop vac peaks at about 2 psi but even a cheapie should be able to double what's needed to support the load.

The trick will be balancing the load and making the platform flat. It would be difficult to get either perfect but get it reasonably close and you should be able to turn it by hand. A more reliable method would be to have a number of compartments underneath. Three in a triangle layout near the edge would be stable. That would provide a stable base so imbalance would not dump the air out as bad as one big disc. There are even companies that make equipment moving "pucks" powered by a shop air hose. Buy a few of them and stick under the deck and no fancy fabrication would be required.
 
 

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