New Build-in Appliances

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Old 10-27-14, 08:39 AM
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New Build-in Appliances

Planing to remodel the kitchen and the 18 years old GE stove will be replaced with separate surface mount cooktop and a build-in oven. The old stove is rated for 120/208V 8.5KW, 120/240V 11.3KW and in the main electric panel there are 2 breakers joint together at 40A each. Behind the old stove there is a junction box in the wall where the the cable from the stove is plugged with a 4 prong plug which I installed myself. I don't remember the cable size into the box but it is copper and should be #10 or perhaps #8. In any case it should be enough to handle the current of the old stove. House is about 30 yrs old

The new cooktop is rated at 208V 5.8KW 40A, 240V 7.7KW 40A
The new build-in oven is rated at 208VAC 2790W 13.4A, 240VAC 3690W 15.4A
There is enough space for both new appliances to be installed where the existing stove is now located (oven will be installed below the cooktop). Non of these units have been purchased yet

First question: can the new appliances be connected to the existing wiring or the existing breakers are not big enough?

I will assume that I should install a new junction box next to the existing to have each new appliance connected properly?
 
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Old 10-27-14, 02:34 PM
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You will need to run a new 20 amp feed for the oven.
 
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Old 10-27-14, 02:49 PM
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Thanks Ray but thats bad news; no way to run a new feed unless I brake open lots of walls which is no practical (panel is on the ground floor and all ceilings are covered with gyprock). Means that replacing the existing stove is on hold now unless I find another oven with different rating
 
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Old 10-27-14, 07:05 PM
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Do you have a cabinet against an outside wall.
 
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Old 10-27-14, 07:41 PM
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Well if I was to guess what you mean Ray I will say no, lol. Anyway yes I do have cabinets facing an exterior wall and its on the same wall where the main electrical panel is but I would not like to drill thru brick walls to run conduits etc. Not that important to do such a work.

Between 120/240V and 120/208V can you please tell me which one is applicable in Canada? This will help me to find alternatives.

There is a new (to me anyway) style range I saw today and they are called “slide in”. Basically they are like a typical range, that is one unit which have both an oven and a glass cooktop and it slides where I have now my old range. But the glass on the cooktop has a 1” lip on the left / right sides to hide the gap with the adjacent cabinets

The attached image is from a Samsung slide in range and it says it needs a 40A circuit. But looking on the Watts, to me that is a lot of Watts for a 40A circuit. What do you think?

Also I found similar units with Whirlpool YWEE760H0DE it says it needs 40A but 50A is recommended. I will assume I have 80A (two 40A breakers connected together)

And a LG LSE3090ST model says power requirements: 120/240VAC 120/208VAC 11.6/8.7KW. This one looks closer to my existing stove power requirements
 
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Old 10-27-14, 07:48 PM
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Two 40A breakers tied together is 240vac 40A. The breaker handles don't get added together.

Your wattage delivered will be at 120/240v.
 
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Old 10-27-14, 09:22 PM
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Thank you PJ for the explanation.

If I remember correctly the cable feeding the existing range has one black, one red and one white wire (plus the ground copper wire). Then I will assume that the black is connected to one 40A breaker and the red to the other 40A breaker. The white wire will be connected to the common bar inside the panel for all whites.

Is the above correct?
 
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Old 10-27-14, 09:48 PM
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Yes..... and if it that is the main panel.... the white and bare copper will go to the same bar.
 
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Old 10-27-14, 10:02 PM
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120/240 is the common household voltage. 120/208 is from a three phase panel more common in a commercial setting.
 
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Old 10-27-14, 11:28 PM
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Then I will assume that the black is connected to one 40A breaker and the red to the other 40A breaker.
Not exactly. You should not have two breakers. You should have one two pole breaker.
 
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Old 10-28-14, 07:45 AM
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Thank you all for the info, I'm glad I know now the difference between the 120/240 & 120/208 and the two pole breakers. But out of curiosity I would like to know the following.

In post #1, I say the cooktop has 240V, 7.7KW (I assume 7.7KW=7700W) and the oven has 240V, 3690W. That is a total of 11390W and I was told that my 40A breaker is not enough for this load.

But in post #5 Samsung says to use a dedicated 240V 40A circuit for his ranges and the Watts are 8750-16500

Obviously I read something wrong but where?
 
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Old 10-28-14, 09:17 AM
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But in post #5 Samsung says to use a dedicated 240V 40A circuit for his ranges and the Watts are 8750-16500

Obviously I read something wrong but where?
You may not have read anything wrong. How often do you cook with ALL burners on HIGH and the oven at it's HIGHEST temperature setting? That is what it would take for maximum rated load to be achieved. I would go with the recommended 40 amp breaker. The last two Whirlpool self cleaning electric ranges I bought both called for 40 amp circuits.
 
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Old 10-28-14, 09:50 AM
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I agree, I never used in my life all burners and oven at the same time but we are a small family and others may use them differently. So from a safety point view I don't know how safe is to use the maximum of 16500W with a 40A circuit which Samsung recommends
 
 

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