Adding two recessed led pots to bathroom


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Old 10-27-14, 06:27 PM
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Adding two recessed led pots to bathroom

I am planning a bathroom remodel and I want to add some pots to light up a shower and toilet area. The bathroom is GFI protected so I would like to run the lights off the circuits that are already in place. There is a light fixture over the vanity. There is a 14-3 wire (black white and red wire) coming into the fixture and a 14-2 (black and white) leaving the fixture over to an outlet. Inside the box, the two black wires are joined with marrettes, the two white wires are joined (including the fixture white wire) and the red is attached to the fixture black wire.

I would like to have the two pots turn on with the vanity light. Can I run a 14-2 wire from the fixture to the pots and how should I wire it? Would it be a simple white to white, black to black thing or does the red wire complicate things? By the way, the outlet is not switched, if that information is important. Is the outlet useful to run the pots off of?

Thanks
 
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Old 10-27-14, 07:28 PM
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The bathroom is GFI protected so I would like to run the lights off the circuits that are already in place. There is a 14-3 wire (black white and red wire) coming into the fixture and a 14-2 (black and white) leaving
Since receptacles should be on a 20 amp breaker which would be #12 if wiring is correct lights are on a separate circuit and there would normally be no reason for that circuit to be GFCI to be protected. Unless the manufacturer requires the cans to be GFCI protected or they are within the footprint of the shower they may not need to be GFCI protected.
 
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Old 10-28-14, 03:42 AM
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The pots will be within the footprint of the shower. One will be directly over the shower and the other just to the right of the shower over the toilet.
 
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Old 10-28-14, 02:19 PM
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I don't know about the CEC, but the lighting would not require gfi protection even if over the shower under the NEC.
 
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Old 10-28-14, 02:59 PM
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Missed the Canada location in my reply. Not sure if Canada requires a 20 amp circuit that I mentioned.
 
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Old 10-28-14, 03:45 PM
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Thanks for the information regarding GFI protection. Given that, how would it be best to wire the pots off of the vanity fixture, or is there a better solution.
 
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Old 10-28-14, 05:19 PM
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What wires do you have at the switch? It sounds like power comes in to the fixture box from the receptacle via the 2 wire, and a 3 wire runs to the switch box.
I would put in a 4x4 deep box with a 1/2'' single device mud ring for the switch box and bring your pots into there. This way if you ever decide to switch them separately, you just replace the single device mud ring for a two device and pop another switch on.
Shower light does not need GFCI protection unless the switch is within a meter of the shower.
 
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Old 10-29-14, 03:55 AM
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There are 3 wires at the switches: 2, 14-2 wires and 1, 14-3 wire. There are 2 single-pole switches, one for the light fixture and one for the fan. The light switch for the fixture has a red wire at the top and a black at the bottom. The fan switch has a black wire at the top and a red at the bottom. All whites are marretted together and grounds to the box.
 
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Old 10-29-14, 02:36 PM
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Ok so you have a pretty busy switch box. If you have no intent of ever switching the lights separately, just run your 14/2 for the pots out of the vanity fixture box.
 
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Old 10-29-14, 02:56 PM
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That's what I want to do. Do I connect the new 14-2 to the red and white as the existing fixture is wired?
 
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Old 10-29-14, 03:03 PM
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You bet. Also if you want to, run a pigtail off of the whites so you do not have to disturb that connection if you ever need to take down the vanity fixture since the neutral is shared between your fixture and receptacle.
 
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Old 10-30-14, 08:10 AM
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Shower light does not need GFCI protection unless the switch is within a meter of the shower.
Trying to understand why the location of the switch determines the need for GFI protection vs the location of the fixture. This seems to be one of the bigger difference between the NEC and CEC. Under the NEC the switch can be 1/16" outside the footprint of the tub or shower and not need GFI protection.
 
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Old 10-30-14, 03:30 PM
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I have no idea pcboss. You would think that the danger would be one of darwin's exceptions standing in a puddle in the shower while changing a bulb, not reaching for a switch.
 
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Old 10-30-14, 06:14 PM
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Since we are quizzing Mr.Awesome, let me ask something too. For the longest time when reading these threads I had no idea what a pot light was, but eventually figured it out. Is that a Canadian term for a recessed can?
 
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Old 10-30-14, 06:58 PM
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Yes joe, that is what I know recessed cans as. Im in the same boat as you, ive never heard anyone use the term recessed can.
 
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Old 10-30-14, 07:02 PM
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Im in the same boat as you, ive never heard anyone use the term recessed can.
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