GFCI Failure or ??

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  #1  
Old 11-02-14, 11:09 AM
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GFCI Failure or ??

We lost power in a segment of a circuit (several outlets and fixtures) that is downstream from a GFCI in the bathroom. Upstream units work normally. The trip (test) button works and the reset button catches normally, and the power light on the GFCI is on, but the downstream power is still off. At the time of the loss, we were running a space heater and hair dryer. I thought GFCIs would not trip for overloads, but in this case, is my first move to replace the GFCI?

Thanks very much.

Bob
 
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  #2  
Old 11-02-14, 11:17 AM
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If the test and reset buttons work normally then it sounds like the GFI receptacle is ok.
You would need to remove the GFI receptacle and check for 120vac on the load lines. If that is ok then you need to move on to the next device in the circuit. You're going to find a loose, possibly burned connection in the circuit.

A space heater should not be powered from that circuit.
 
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Old 11-02-14, 11:18 AM
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I think you should look for a failed connection from the high current draw of the heater. Look at the last working or first non working receptacle.
 
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Old 11-02-14, 12:10 PM
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Thanks for the quick responses.

The short story is, the line is working again, but I don't know why. I pulled out the receptacle the heater was connected to, verified it was dead. The connections look secure, no sign of burnout. This is not a series circuit; it branches out from the GFI. So, as suggested, I went back to start with the GFI receptacle, which had been dead, and found it was now hot, and all the branches are also live.

Do I have an intermittent of some sort?

For my education, why would a bad connection in one receptacle disable other branches in the line? The GFI never actually tripped on its own.

My father taught me that taking something apart and reassembling it works almost as often as knowing what you're doing. Maybe this is such a case.

Thanks again
 
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Old 11-02-14, 12:34 PM
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Normal connections are daisy chained. If one part fails everywhere downstream stops working.
 
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Old 11-02-14, 01:06 PM
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If you trip the GFI receptacle.... note which receptacles go dead. You would need to check each one of them for a connection problem.
 
  #7  
Old 11-02-14, 02:09 PM
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I went back to start with the GFI receptacle, which had been dead, and found it was now hot,
That tells me the intermittent loose/bad connection is upstream from the GFCI receptacle.
 
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