How many 20 amp outlets for kitchen appliances

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Old 11-02-14, 05:35 PM
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How many 20 amp outlets for kitchen appliances

I have a bare wall in my kitchen about 5 1/2 feet long that I would like to relocate the refrigerator to, as well as a custom counter/cabinet to accommodate the toaster oven, a rarely used microwave, and possibly the coffee maker. I know the fridge will have it's own 20 amp outlet. Do the microwave and toaster oven each need a 20 amp outlet? Do they all have to have dedicated runs to the panel or can they piggy back off the other?
 
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Old 11-02-14, 05:45 PM
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I wrote this the other day in a similar thread.

Kitchens are required to have at least two small appliance branch circuits (SABC). My personal opinion is that is not enough in a modern kitchen. Pantry receptacles are also required to be on a SABC as well as dining room receptacles. Refrigerators MAY be on one of the SABCs but doing so limits the power available at other SABC receptacles. Any device that requires more than (I think) 50% (might be a bit higher) of the power of the circuit needs to be on a dedicated circuit. This usually means larger refrigerators or built-n microwave ovens. None of these circuits may serve any other loads although it is allowable for a garbage grinder to share a circuit with the dishwasher and gas ranges are specifically allowed to utilize the SABC for the ignitors and timing functions.

Personally, I would have no fewer than three SABCs for the kitchen counters as well as a dedicated circuit for panty and dining room receptacles on a fourth SABC. Don't forget about instant hot water dispensers which may require a dedicated circuit depending on their load.

Read more: http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...#ixzz3HxwUBmyr
 
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Old 11-02-14, 05:51 PM
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In addition, no space on the counter can be more than 24" from a receptacle as measured along the wall line.
 
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Old 11-02-14, 05:59 PM
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Great Furd! Pretty much what I figured. Will probably put in 4, won't hurt to have extra. Thanks for your quick response. The link has some helpful info too.
 
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Old 11-02-14, 06:12 PM
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pcboss, good to know. My plan is to build a custom counter with a shelf that will house the microwave under the counter. Another shelf mounted on the wall above the counter to house the toaster oven, which will free up counter space for the coffee maker. The fridge is on it's own. Are there any restrictions or codes for putting outlets higher or lower, in this case behind the counter/cabinets? I'm thinking 4 outlets.
 
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Old 11-02-14, 07:58 PM
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Two more things come to mind, all kitchen circuits need to have ground fault protection and no receptacle may be mounted in a counter top with the openings facing upward. Not sure about any height requirements or restrictions.
 
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Old 11-02-14, 08:52 PM
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All of my kitchen counter receptacles are dedicated, in addition to dedicated for the fridge, and microwave which is also shared with a commercial kettle popper. I still manage to trip breakers on occasion.
 
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Old 11-02-14, 09:10 PM
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But Justin, you're a party animal and as you admit you have commercial equipment that I'm quite sure exceeds 1800 watts.

The only time I have tripped a SABC is when I had both the microwave oven and the toaster oven running AND had a portable A/C unit plugged into a dining room receptacle; all on the same SABC.
 
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Old 11-02-14, 09:31 PM
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The receptacles cannot be higher than 20" above the counter in order to satisfy the spacing requirements.
 
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Old 11-02-14, 10:46 PM
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But Justin, you're a party animal and as you admit you have commercial equipment that I'm quite sure exceeds 1800 watts.

The only time I have tripped a SABC is when I had both the microwave oven and the toaster oven running AND had a portable A/C unit plugged into a dining room receptacle; all on the same SABC.

While I have equipment that draws up to 6KW, most consumer kitchen equipment these days uses 1,000W-1500W each, which usually limits you to 1 or 2 appliances per SABC.
 
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Old 11-03-14, 04:48 AM
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The layout will be "similar" to this pic. Except where the lower drawers are, there will be an opening for the microwave. The toaster oven above and possibly the coffee maker on the counter itself. All the outlets will be on the wall, (behind the appliance, 1 above, 1 below the normal counter height and 1 at counter height). The fridge will be to the right with its own outlet.

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Old 11-03-14, 06:43 AM
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I know the fridge will have it's own 20 amp outlet. Do the microwave and toaster oven each need a 20 amp outlet?
The circuits do indeed need to be 20 amp, but the duplex receptacles only need to be 15 amp. I cannot think of a single reason in a typical home why 20 amp duplex recetacles would be needed anywhere.
 
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Old 11-03-14, 04:34 PM
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First , our local / city code requires 1 more kitchen circuit , than NEC .

I inherited our house when Dad passed away .

The existing loadcenter ( north exterior kitchen wall ) was a 6 or 8 circuit FPE . I replaced it with a new C-G loadcenter , with about 24 - 1" spaces . The 2 walls that had appliances and / or cabinets / counter tops , were exterior walls and the roof was a hip roof .

The closest receptacle to the left of the new loadcenter , I was able to use the existing Romex to pull a new Romex . A 12/3 W/G , which I feed 2 circuits . One stopped there ( at that receptacle ) & the other circuit powered up the old Romex that had continues on to the next receptacle .

I installed a 2 gang plastic old work box below the load center . I dropped 4 circuits to it and installed 2 duplex receptacles , each with the " bridge " broken out on the " hot side of the duplex receptacle . Various appliances near this quad receptacle had long enough cords to reach .

The old Romex going to the closest receptacle to the right of the loadcenter was put on a dedicated circuit . This gave me a total of 6 circuits in the kitchen . Have not tripped a kitchen circuit breaker since .

I still have spaces in the loadcenter . I would have added more circuits , but I would have had to do that from underneath ( pier & beam floor ) . Being old and fat , it is almost impossible for me to squeeze under the kitchen floor .

Bottom line , as long as you have spacer / spares in the loadcenter , the more circuits / receptacles in the kitchen , the better . Only down side is cost & my material was not costing me anything .

I pretty much have the material gathered up to replace the service , if I can ever talking myself into getting off my lazy behind .

God bless
Wyr
 
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Old 11-03-14, 04:50 PM
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I installed a 2 gang plastic old work box below the load center . I dropped 4 circuits to it and installed 2 duplex receptacles , each with the " bridge " broken out on the " hot side of the duplex receptacle . Various appliances near this quad receptacle had long enough cords to reach
If the receptacles serve the countertop areas they must be GFI protected. A GFI cannot be split wired across two circuits. Some changes may need to be made.
 
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Old 11-03-14, 05:02 PM
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The quad is below the loadcenter , at ADA height above the finished floor .

Serves a 12,000 BTU 120 VAC window A/C , frig , portable dish washer , microwave ( on top of the portable dish washer ) .

The 4 circuits were run in two rune of 12/3 W/G Romex . This makes them two multi-wire branch circuits . The 2 CB's feeding the 1st Romex has handle ties on the handles . As does the second Romex .

These are not counter-top receptacles .

God bless
Wyr
 
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