Grounded plug to receptacle without ground?

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Old 11-02-14, 09:27 PM
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Grounded plug to receptacle without ground?

So, If I had a cord with 2 hots and 1 ground, and I wanted to plug this into one of the older dryer receptacles that has 2 hots and 1 neutral, how would I go about doing this?
I know that it wouldn't be up to code, but is it possible?
Would it be possible to wire it to a plug that would fit the receptacle, using 10/3 SOOW the 2 hots to the 2 hots of the non grounded plug in, leave the neutral slot empty, and then take the grounded plug from the soow, and wire it elsewhere? Is there something that provides grounding that I would simply be able to screw the grounding wire from the SOOW cord into?
 
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Old 11-02-14, 09:33 PM
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Legally, no. You could connect the equipment ground to the neutral prong and use if for a strictly 240 volt load and it would work but it would not be code compliant.

There IS a slight possibility that the receptacle has both a neutral and equipment conductor available and that "they" simply used the 3-prong receptacle. That is how my dryer is wired, three insulated conductors and a bare copper equipment ground that is not connected except to the metal box.
 
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Old 11-02-14, 09:44 PM
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So, this is an item with a European(I believe) plug. It currently is wired hot, hot(originally neutral but IS hot), ground.

Wouldn't wiring the ground to the neutral receptacle be sending a hot load through the ground to the equipment?
The outlet is a dryer outlet. the equipment is NOT a dryer.
 
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Old 11-02-14, 09:58 PM
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Equipment grounding conductor only carries a current when in a fault condition and then only long enough to trip the circuit breaker. Under normal circumstances only the two "hot" conductors have a current flow. This applies to straight 240 volt equipment only; a 240/120 volt load WOULD indeed be sending return current along the grounding conductor. It also only applies IF the branch circuit originates in the service panel and not a "sub" panel.
 
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Old 11-02-14, 10:08 PM
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ok, this is a 220/240v device. The receptacle that the device will be plugged into is in an apartment. With this being an apartment, I would assume that the circuit originates in a sub panel? So, when I rewire the machines cord to plug into a receptacle like this, my machine will, or will NOT be getting a hot current from the neutral prong?
 
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Old 11-02-14, 10:15 PM
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Currently, I have the machine cord wired to a Nema 6-15 Male plug. Hot/Hot/ground
Can I wire one end of the soow cable to a Nema 6-20R Female receptacle Hot/Hot/Ground
then the other end of the soow cable to the dryer plug Hot/Hot/Neutral(this wire would be connected to the ground of a Nema 6-20R Female receptacle)

the 6-15 Male plug plugs into the 6-20R Female receptacle, and the dryer plug would then be plugged into the dryer receptacle

machine hot--> hot -->hot
machine hot--> hot -->hot
machine ground--> ground -->neutral
 
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Old 11-02-14, 10:28 PM
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The machine won't "receive" anything from the neutral as long as no fault with the machine exists. There IS a possibility of a fault current IF some other 120 volt appliance faulted OR the neutral is lost between the sub=panel and the service panel.

Now as I originally stated, there is a slight possibility that you have a bare equipment grounding conductor in the box for the dryer receptacle that is not being used. You could ask the landlord to install a proper four-prong receptacle (it would require changing the dryer cord if you have a dryer).
 
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Old 11-02-14, 10:40 PM
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Thank you kindly for that information. I guess I will just wire it up with the neutral plug. Thanks so much!
 
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Old 11-04-14, 12:34 PM
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Ok. so, I bought a cord, and its a dryer cord that I need. Problem is, it has 8 gauge wiring.
I'm trying to wire it to a 6-20R female receptacle.
The wires, are too large to fit into the small holes of the 6-20R.
What are my options?
instead of taking ALL of the wiring for each individual wire, would it be possible to just cut a small amount of the width of the wire off(each wire is made up of abunch of strands of wire), so that small amount is no longer exposed outside of the rubber casing, and just wire the rest of the exposed wire into the 620R?
So basically, taking however much wire is exposed, and thinning it out by cutting off a few strands of the wire
 

Last edited by yum114; 11-04-14 at 12:52 PM.
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Old 11-04-14, 01:14 PM
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Ok. so, I bought a cord, and its a dryer cord that I need. Problem is, it has 8 gauge wiring.
Atre you sure. A dryer cord is normally #10. A 6-20 receptacle should take #10. Are you doing this in a box or trying to use a female cord cap. If coed cap use a box and receptacle instead.
So basically, taking however much wire is exposed, and thinning it out by cutting off a few strands of the wire
NEVER do that.

Does your landlord know the liability you are exposing yourself and him to?
 
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Old 11-04-14, 01:24 PM
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Personally I'd be more concerned about the fact that this machine, whatever it happens to be, was probably intended for use with a breaker or fuse smaller than the 30A that one would expect to be on the dryer circuit. In comparison to that, the ground/neutral issue is of less concern. Additionally you mention it's a Euro device which implies it may have some frequency compatibility problems in North America. Whatever you're doing with this machine in your apartment probably isn't a great idea, but could be done in a safe way with some minor involvement of the landlord and (probably) an electrician. Local laws vary as to who can do electrical work on rental properties.
 
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Old 11-04-14, 01:33 PM
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I have concerns about this whole process and equipment. The OP has not been very forthcoming with information.
 
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Old 11-04-14, 01:46 PM
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It supports US frequency
It's wired for 2 hits and an earth(from the factory)

It's a cord cap that I was trying to fit it to.

I'll kill that idea then.

I was told its 8 Gauge. But could be 10. I'll try and check.
Pcboss, what information am I alleviating? If there's more info that you're looking for, let me know.
 
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Old 11-04-14, 05:17 PM
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Is this just a rehash of http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...v-us-120v.html or http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...-america.html?

You have been told you need to make a plug in temporary power supply assuming there is a ground at the drier receptacle. Your statement you would have to take it with you every time you left the apartment* is absurd and makes no sense. Just make the temporary power supply as outlined in http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...-america.html? or if the dryer receptacle isn't grounded have the landlord at your cost install the correct receptacle.

*From previous thread:
And this would be something that I've got to take when I leave, every time I leave.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 11-04-14 at 05:32 PM.
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Old 11-04-14, 07:48 PM
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What kind of box do I use for the temporary power supply?
Is it just a normal breaker box, or is it called something else?
 
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Old 11-04-14, 08:54 PM
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