No space on 1st Neutral bar - 200 amp panel


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Old 11-03-14, 07:12 AM
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No space on 1st Neutral bar - 200 amp panel

I have a 200 Amp Panel. On the left side there are two bars - 1 is filled with all neutral and ground with no more room to add wiring. Directly below this is another similar bar with nothing connected to it.

I need to add a few more circuits. Can I simply add a jumper between the two bars with a strand of 6-3 copper to allow a continued pattern of adding the neutral and ground wires for the new circuits?

thanks,

KJ
 
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Old 11-03-14, 07:30 AM
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Directly below this is another similar bar with nothing connected to it.
Is it a ground bar not a neutral bar? A neutral bar is on plastic insulators. A ground bar is fastened directly to the metal box. If the third bar is a ground bar then you can move the grounds to that bar. Grounds only can be two per hole.
 
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Old 11-03-14, 07:49 AM
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I have a 200 Amp Panel. On the left side there are two bars
A close-up picture of the panel with the cover removed would be helpful. http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...rt-images.html
 

Last edited by ray2047; 11-03-14 at 07:52 AM. Reason: Add link.
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Old 11-03-14, 08:47 AM
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Generally speaking, the neutral (white) wires should be on the elevated bar at one-per-screw. If this is the main panel for the house, grounds can also be on that bar. Grounds could also go the bar that mounts directly to the metal box. Ground wires can be up to two or three per screw as long as the wires are the same AWG. Consult the panel label for details.

To free up terminals for new wires, I would approach the problem by moving ground wires off the neutral bar to the ground bar, doubling or tripling them up where possible. As the other guys mentioned, a picture would help us identify which bar is which.
 
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Old 11-03-14, 05:50 PM
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Check to see if there is a bonding screw , at the neutral bar that bonds the neutral bar to the metal enclosure / can of the loadcenter .

There are specific ruls about this and many people ( including some electricians ) do not comprehend the differences between a neutral bar and a ground bar .

And , yes , good photos would help .

God bless
Wyr
 
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Old 11-03-14, 07:37 PM
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There are specific ruls about this and many people ( including some electricians ) do not comprehend the differences between a neutral bar and a ground bar .
That would be using the term "Electrican" loosely. In my opinion, practicing the electrial trade doesn't necessarily make an electrician. There are a lot of "Jacklegs" out there doing electrical work too, most of whom aren't regulated/licensed in any manner.

Ground wires can be up to two or three per screw as long as the wires are the same AWG. Consult the panel label for details.
There is good information here. I generally always said as "rule-of-thumb" two ground wires of the same size per hole, but several months ago I actually read the fine print inside a Cutler-Hammer BR series loadcenter. They allow up to 3 solid ground wires of the same size per hole.
 
 

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