12/2 wiring circuit to garage at recently purchased home


  #1  
Old 11-14-14, 04:06 PM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 205
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
12/2 wiring circuit to garage at recently purchased home

I'm looking to fix this mess of wiring thats in my garage and adding to the circuit.

First off, I've had a post similar to this one regarding the wiring in my bathroom that I've yet to deal with but the issue is similar. It's much easier for me to understand what I have here because my garage is not finished and I can see everything where in the bathroom I cannot without removing drywall. The way things are wired together is very confusing and I'm not sure why it was done this way in the first place or if it's even safe for that matter.

I'll post a few pics and explain where each wire and bomex is going to.

Name:  garage_wiring.jpg
Views: 1034
Size:  11.1 KB

I labeled what is believed to be the hot wire coming in that feeds everything shown on this circuit as (HOT). The black blob and white blob is where the wire strands are all combined together by sodering and electrical tape. What I dont understand is why the white strands are just all connected to each other except for the switch on the right where it's connected to the screw on switch. It seems to me that they just connected the blacks by sodering them in order to run hot to all switches and the receptacle at bottom. Shouldnt these be done in a similar manner but with a wire nut on hot wire and seperate wire strands from that nut to each switch and receptacle seperately instead of the way this is shown? The switches on the left and right are 3 way switches as well. Please give me any insight or ideas you may have on this.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 11-14-14 at 05:54 PM. Reason: Croped and enlarged image to easily seen size.
  #2  
Old 11-14-14, 06:08 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 29,711
Upvotes: 0
Received 15 Upvotes on 13 Posts
The wiring in your diagram looks correct. Pre wire nuts wires were spliced by soldering. Then wrapped with rubber tape then the rubber tape protected with friction tape.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 11-16-14 at 02:55 PM.
  #3  
Old 11-16-14, 01:56 PM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 205
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
I'm trying to replace some old sheathed 12/2 wiring from the switch because I'm putting in new flourescent lights in my garage and figured I'd replace the old sheathed cable while I'm there. Can I just cut off the old white wires that are tied together by soldering behind the solder and just wire nut them back together? Also, Is it because these are light switches that the white wires are just connected to each other and not attached to any screws?
 
  #4  
Old 11-16-14, 03:03 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 29,711
Upvotes: 0
Received 15 Upvotes on 13 Posts
Can I just cut off the old white wires that are tied together by soldering behind the solder and just wire nut them back together?
Yes but if you are using the same cables no need to. Note if the cable to the garage has no ground you can not add any fixtures. An ungrounded circuit can't be extended because the new wiring must meet current code which requires a ground.
Is it because these are light switches that the white wires are just connected to each other and not attached to any screws?
Yes. Neutrals are never connected to switches that don't have an additional function such as a timer or motion sensor. Even then the neutral does not go to the actual switch just to provide power to the additional function.

You may want to buy a book such as Wiring Simplified available at online book sellers such as Amazon and in the electrical aisle of some home stores. You really need to know the basics of how wiring works before you do any wiring yourself.

Is the garage detached. If so how is power run to the garage?
 
  #5  
Old 11-16-14, 03:45 PM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 205
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Yes its a detached garage with a breezeway inbetween house and garage. All 12/2 cables coming into this 3 gang box have grounds which are all connected to each other and wrapped around screw in the back of the metal box. Therefore these are grounded and fixtures can be added. The only thing I noticed was the wiring going from 3 way switch to 3 way switch at another location does not have a ground wire. These switches simply just have a red and black strand (carriers) and another black (hot). I dont see any ground anywhere for these. I'm not sure if the cable they used didn't have a ground with it or if it was just removed. The bomex coming from breaker to garage has ground (this bomex feeds power to all fixtures in garage. The bomex to the switch that controls the lights in garage has a ground. The receptacle downstream from these switches has a ground. These 3 ways switches should have new 12/2 cable ran with a ground added, correct?

I was going to connect all the grounds together with a crimp sleeve (there are 3 grounds present even though there is 5 cables of wiring) and then run each of the 3 strands to the green screw on each of the 3 light switches. Also, do I have to have a seperate strand of copper tied to this crimp sleeve as well, going to the ground screw in the metal box or not? Previously, these 3 incoming grounds were all wrapped together and tied to grounding screw in the metal box.
 

Last edited by Jrk5230; 11-16-14 at 04:00 PM.
  #6  
Old 11-16-14, 04:17 PM
CasualJoe's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: United States
Posts: 9,870
Received 185 Upvotes on 166 Posts
do I have to have a seperate strand of copper tied to this crimp sleeve as well, going to the ground screw in the metal box or not? Previously, these 3 incoming grounds were all wrapped together and tied to grounding screw in the metal box.
The easiest would be to just ground the box and then use self-grounding receptacles. The box stores have them, look for 15 amp receptacles that are commercial rated, about $2 to $3 each. The switches don't need a ground wire.

The only thing I noticed was the wiring going from 3 way switch to 3 way switch at another location does not have a ground wire. These switches simply just have a red and black strand (carriers) and another black (hot).
That must be separate individual wires because a 3-wire cable would have a white conductor too. Replace it with xx-3 w/G cable
 
  #7  
Old 11-16-14, 04:24 PM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 205
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
That must be separate individual wires because a 3-wire cable would have a white conductor too. Replace it with xx-3 w/G cable
The bomex to the 1 switch has red, black, white, and ground wire where the bomex to the other switch has just white and black wire with no ground.

The easiest would be to just ground the box and then use self-grounding receptacles. The box stores have them, look for 15 amp receptacles that are commercial rated, about $2 to $3 each. The switches don't need a ground wire.
It's totally fine to just run the grounds to the screw in back of metal box where the grounds were connected before or should I run the grounds to each switch and the box as well? Or I could wrap the grounds together, crimp them with a sleeve, and cut 2 off leaving 1 ground wire and connect that to the grounding screw on the metal box. Which is the better way to go if both directions work?
 

Last edited by Jrk5230; 11-16-14 at 04:52 PM.
  #8  
Old 11-16-14, 05:03 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 29,711
Upvotes: 0
Received 15 Upvotes on 13 Posts
No such thing as "bomex". There is NM-b, AKA Romex.
These switches simply just have a red and black strand (carriers) and another black (hot)
Actually two travelers and a neutral based on your diagram. Power for the light comes from a 2-conductor cable connected to the neutral and common of the top switch.
 
  #9  
Old 11-16-14, 07:52 PM
CasualJoe's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: United States
Posts: 9,870
Received 185 Upvotes on 166 Posts
The bomex to the 1 switch has red, black, white, and ground wire where the bomex to the other switch has just white and black wire with no ground.
It's a 3-way switch setup, both switches need 3 wires. The most common method is to run a 3-wire cable between the two boxes. There are other methods, but 3 wire cable is required at both switches unless you have a conduit system. Like Ray said, it isn't bomex.



The easiest would be to just ground the box and then use self-grounding receptacles. The box stores have them, look for 15 amp receptacles that are commercial rated, about $2 to $3 each. The switches don't need a ground wire.

It's totally fine to just run the grounds to the screw in back of metal box where the grounds were connected before or should I run the grounds to each switch and the box as well? Or I could wrap the grounds together, crimp them with a sleeve, and cut 2 off leaving 1 ground wire and connect that to the grounding screw on the metal box. Which is the better way to go if both directions work?
Read again:

The easiest would be to just ground the box and then use self-grounding receptacles. The box stores have them, look for 15 amp receptacles that are commercial rated, about $2 to $3 each. The switches don't need a ground wire.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: