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Is replacing all two prong outlets with GFCI outlets a good idea?

Is replacing all two prong outlets with GFCI outlets a good idea?

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  #1  
Old 11-18-14, 12:32 PM
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Is replacing all two prong outlets with GFCI outlets a good idea?

I have an old house that has electrical wiring with just two wires and no ground wire and no ground wire to the metal box. Is it alright to replace old outlets with GFCI outlets.

I am also thinking about redoing the drywall in my house and I would have someone replace the wiring and the fuse box (with a breaker box) whenever I do this. Is the rewiring of the house a better way to go?

Why are people allowed to sell and buy homes that do not have a grounded electrical system?
 
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  #2  
Old 11-18-14, 12:41 PM
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You can replace the first outlet on the run with a GFCI...then label the rest. The labels come in the box. I think you can also buy them separately?

Ungrounded systems worked well for many years...it's grandfathered in until major work is done.
 
  #3  
Old 11-18-14, 01:03 PM
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Yes it's a good idea to reduce the hazard of shock on ungrounded circuits. Rewiring, or fishing new ground wires, is an option but really isn't necessary unless you have a specific identified need. In many places building code would require updating wire to modern code if you tear the drywall down (and this is a permitted job).
 
  #4  
Old 11-18-14, 01:13 PM
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As far as the labels, I am not an electrician by trade, so will welcome clarification if I am incorrect, but there should be two types of labels in the box with the GFCI receptacle. When installing a GFCI on a grounded circuit, you would not need to label the GFCI receptacle, but would apply the "GFCI protected" label on any subsequent receptacles on the circuit, provided that you have wired it to provide protection to those receptacles. But, in your case, having circuits without a ground, you would install the GFCI receptacles as desired, and would apply the "no equipment ground" to each of the ones that you install.
 
  #5  
Old 11-18-14, 01:29 PM
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You would apply both labels on ungrounded, GFCI protected recetapcles. "No equipment ground" and "GFCI protected outlet". The labels do not have to be the ones included with the receptacles. You can make them with a label maker, engraver, paint or however you want.
 
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