Afci/gfci

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  #1  
Old 11-19-14, 01:52 AM
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Afci/gfci

Am I correct that only GFCI is required for the bathroom receptacles and the outside receptacles? Am I correct that only AFCI is required for the microwave above the cooktop receptacle, the behind the refrigerator receptacle, and the garbage disposal receptacle?
 
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Old 11-19-14, 03:19 AM
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It will depend on which code version your locality is under and when your house was built/remodeled. GFCI's are required in all bathrooms and kitchen small appliance circuits. AFCIs began their journey being only required in bedrooms, and now have expanded to all circuits except those in the kitchen and bathrooms protected by GFCIs. AFCIs have never to my knowledge been relegated to the locations you mentioned, only.
 
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Old 11-19-14, 07:34 AM
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Circuit breakers are now starting to become available that provide both AFCI and GFCI protection. There are some locations listed in the 2014 NEC, from what I understand, that require both.
 
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Old 11-19-14, 09:08 AM
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CJ, is it with Class A 5 mA or the Class B 30 MA protection?
 
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Old 11-19-14, 08:54 PM
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CJ, is it with Class A 5 mA or the Class B 30 MA protection?
As I recall, all AFCI breakers also provide 30 mA GFCI protection, but the AFCI breaker I mentioned provides 5 mA protection, didn't we touch on this in another thread? The one I remember is a new product from Square D in both QO and Homeline versions. Here is some good info.

Section 210.12 of the 2014 NEC now requires both Combination Arc Fault and Ground Fault protection on all 120 volt single-phase 15 A and 20 A outlets or devices in kitchen and laundry areas. Prior to the release of the QO and HomeLine Dual Function Circuit Breakers, a contractor or homeowner’s only choice would have been to use a Combination Arc Fault circuit breaker in conjunction with an expensive, bulky Ground Fault receptacle. The new Dual Function circuit breakers help reduce cost and eliminate the hassle of using two separate devices to provide the critical electrical protection against arc fault and ground fault hazards in the home.
http://www.schneider-electric.us/doc...reakers_pr.pdf
 
  #6  
Old 11-20-14, 04:36 AM
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I am in Colorado and I am rewiring an old house. Colorado has adopted the 2014 code. There is a bedroom, bathroom, laundry room, and a kitchen, dining, and living room area. The panel is Square D Homeline. I plan to use the duel function (AFCI/GFCI) breakers for the laundry room receptacles, the kitchen counter receptacles, and the dishwasher receptacle. I plan to use regular breakers and GFCI receptacles for the bathroom and outside receptacles. All the rest of the 120 breakers will be AFCI. I think this satisfies the code. However, I was not sure about having AFCI breakers with no GFCI on the over the cooktop microwave, the refrigerator, and the garbage disposer. I was also not sure about the breakers for the bathroom and outside receptacles not being AFCI.
 
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Old 11-20-14, 06:24 PM
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As I recall, all AFCI breakers also provide 30 mA GFCI protection, but the AFCI breaker I mentioned provides 5 mA protection, didn't we touch on this in another thread? The one I remember is a new product from Square D in both QO and Homeline versions. Here is some good info.
They are the ones with a purple test button. If I was building a house, I would use these on every circuit, as IMO GFCI is better protection than AFCI.

 
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Old 11-21-14, 08:12 AM
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They actually preform two different functions,the GFCI are probably less of a nuisance.
Geo
 
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Old 11-24-14, 05:29 AM
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OK, I will go ahead and use the duel function (AFCI/GFCI) breakers for the over the cooktop microwave, the refrigerator, and the garbage disposer. All the kitchen and laundry receptacles will have duel function (AFCI/GFCI) breakers. The bathroom and outside receptacles will have standard breakers with GFCI receptacles. All other 120 volt breakers will be AFCI.

I started this job under the 2011 code and all the breakers met the code. My permit expired and I am finishing the job under the 2014 code. My original plan to meet the new code was to replace three standard breakers with AFCI breakers and five standard breakers with duel function (AFCI/GFCI) breakers. Instead I will replace eight standard breakers with duel function (AFCI/GFCI) breakers, two in the laundry and six in the kitchen. The price difference between the AFCI and the duel function (AFCI/GFCI) breakers is only about $10 per breaker and the work is the same.

Thanks for the help.
 
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