New Kitchen Wall Outlet


  #1  
Old 11-22-14, 07:52 PM
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New Kitchen Wall Outlet

I'm replacing my kitchen counters along with the backsplash and now is the time to add an extra wall outlet for convenience.

The power to the outlet I want to feed the new outlet from is supplied by a dual 15A breaker and the brass joint between the 2 hot feeds is broken. There is no problem to connect the white wire to the existing outlet since only one screw is used at the moment but since there is no space to add a new wire to one of the hot screws I was thinking to use the slot at the back of the outlet.

Is there anything wrong with this?

I know that the load to the outlets should also be considered but the outlet I will get the power from is in a location very difficult to access and is never used. However it is possible that one day both outlets may be used at the same time and in that case if the load exceeds 15A what will happen? It will just trip the breaker?

The existing outlet has 14 AWG wires and I will use the same for the new outlet
 
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Old 11-23-14, 05:03 AM
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What country are you in? Your profile is not complete. Your proposal would not be code compliant in the U.S.
 
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Old 11-23-14, 05:03 AM
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Not 100% on CEC, but NEC requires all circuits serving kitchen/dining to be 20 amp circuits.
 
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Old 11-23-14, 05:34 AM
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I'm in Canada and updated my profile. The house was built in 1986, perhaps the code then did not require 20A circuits in the kitchen.

Another way to feed the new outlet is to use the black wire for the existing outlet and the red wire for the new outlet. Again not as per code but at least the breaker will not be tripped if both outlets are used at the same time. However the breaker will trip if someone plugs two items on the same outlet (assuming that both items exceed the 15A load)
 
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Old 11-23-14, 06:32 AM
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The CEC requires a split wired duplex on a 15 amp circuit or a 20 t slot device on a 20 amp circuit for their SABC.
 
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Old 11-23-14, 09:36 AM
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I guess I can't do what is required so I will forget about the new outlet
 
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Old 11-23-14, 09:51 AM
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I guess I can't do what is required
Use 14-3 to the new receptacle.
At the existing receptacle:
  • Connect the existing red wire and new red wire together and pigtail to one of the two brass screws.
  • Connect the existing black wire to the new black wire and pigtail to the other brass screw.
  • Connect the existing white wire and the new white wire together and pigtail to one of the silver screws.
  • Connect grounds per code.
At the new receptacle:
  • White wire to silver screw.
  • Break the tab between the brass screws.
  • Connect red to one of the brass screws.
  • Connect black to the other brass screw.
  • Connect grounds according to code.
If the circuit breaker is not GFCI change to two single pole handle tied GFCIs or a 2-pole GFCI breaker.

I was thinking to use the slot at the back of the outlet.
Never use the slots in back. They are less reliable. Always use the screws if available or if all are in use pigtail.
 
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Old 11-23-14, 10:16 AM
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Thanks Ray

Actually the only cable I have available is 14-3. Sound good what you say except the pigtails which I may have a problem fit all of them in the existing box but I will try

I don't understand what you say about the circuit breaker. What I have in my electrical panel is two 15A breakers and their handles are tied together with a bar.
 
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Old 11-23-14, 10:49 AM
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Kitchen receptacles should be GFCI protected. Because a GFCI receptacle can't be split you must use GFCI breakers.

Use a deep single gang receptacle box.
 
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Old 11-23-14, 01:45 PM
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In Canada only receptacles within 1.5m of the sink require gfi protection.
 
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Old 11-23-14, 02:35 PM
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Thank you all for the help
 
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Old 11-24-14, 01:20 PM
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Hey Ray, I have no problem following your instructions mentioned in your post #7 but out of curiosity and to also learn why it is not better to leave the black wire as it is on the existing wall outlet and remove the red wire from the existing outlet and connect it to the new wall outlet?

This way the existing outlet is controlled by one breaker and the new wall outlet is controlled by the other breaker
 
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Old 11-24-14, 02:00 PM
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Simply because the CEC requires it to be that way. Not the most satisfying answer.

I suspect their motivation is so you can plug in two high wattage devices like a kettle and a toaster in the same duplex receptacle without tripping the breaker.

If the old box is too small for all the splices you can cut it out by cutting the nails with a hacksaw blade and replacing it with a deep 2 gang old work box.
 
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Old 11-24-14, 02:32 PM
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The yankee boys have pretty well got your covered.

As stated you're allowed 15A split receptacles or 20A receptacles on your kitchen counter. But no more than 2 receptacles per circuit.
Receptacles also need to be of the tamper resistant variety.
 
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Old 11-24-14, 05:12 PM
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Thank you guys, the answers are good enough for me

No problem with the old box to fit the new splices but if not able to do so I will do as you say Ben
 
 

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