Aroma AHP 312 hot plate

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Old 11-24-14, 06:25 PM
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Aroma AHP 312 hot plate

I just bought the Aroma AHP 312 double burner 1440 watts, 120 volts, and would appreciate it if someone could answer the following question:

It has two burners, one larger (7 1/2" 800 watts) and one smaller (6 1/4" 640 watts).
Can this unit be plugged into my regular wall AC outlet? (My outlet has two vertical slots and then a round hole centered below them. The left slot is slightly larger than the right.) Think it might be called polarized?

Here is the URL for the Aroma if needed:

AROMA Double Burner Diecast Hot Plate-AHP-312 at The Home Depot
 
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Old 11-24-14, 06:49 PM
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Yep a standard 120V outlet is all you need
Make sure there is nothing else plugged into the circuit or you might trip a breaker
 
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Old 11-24-14, 09:00 PM
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Thank you for your prompt response.
 
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Old 11-25-14, 10:04 AM
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Sorry, but forgot ask:

You mention "or you might trip a breaker."
What does that mean and what would I have to do if if does happen?
 
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Old 11-26-14, 04:21 AM
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Your dual hotplate is approaching the power limit for a 15 ampere branch circuit. Depending on what else is connected to the particular circuit you might trip a circuit breaker or blow a fuse if you have fuses instead of circuit breakers.

If you are using this on a kitchen or dining room circuit built in the last 15-20 years there should be no problem unless there is also another large heating appliance, such as a coffee maker, toaster oven, electric frying pan or griddle or the like connected to the same circuit.
 
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Old 11-26-14, 04:05 PM
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Thank you.

When you say "you might trip a circuit breaker," what does that mean? Is it dangerous?
And, if it happens, what would I have to do?

My nephew said he believes I have 8 circuit breakers. 2 light blue 2 red 2 light blue 2 red (the blue are supposed to be 15 amp and the red 20 amp, if I remember correctly).

(I am 80 years old and know nothing about electricity, trip circuit breaker, watts, etc.)
 

Last edited by robert9; 11-26-14 at 04:58 PM.
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Old 11-26-14, 06:01 PM
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When you say "you might trip a circuit breaker," what does that mean?
The circuit breaker will shut off the circuit to protect the wiring if you draw to many amps. Not dangerous. It is the intended purpose of the circuit breaker to prevent dangerous situations.
 
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Old 11-27-14, 05:35 PM
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Thank you so much.
I believe the hot plate would be on the "red" circuit which is 20 amp. I', trying to learn all I can.

#1- If the circuit breaker would "trip," if I was overloading it, what would I have to do?

#2- I've read the following and wonder if it is true or not:

"Most modern residential circuits are 15 or 20 amps, so we're looking at a max load of either (15A x 120V =) 1800 watts or (20A x 120V =) 2400 watts before the breaker trips"
 
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Old 11-27-14, 06:00 PM
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You don't want a circuit breaker constantly tripping. It's not only not the best thing for the breaker it signifies a change needs to be made. If you're using that unit on a 20A circuit you should be ok. Using one element at a time will most likely never trip the breaker... there is a slim possibility with both elements on.

There is no exact rating at which the breaker will trip. A circuit breaker should trip instantly on a short but be able to maintain it's rating under load. The continuous load on a breaker should not exceed 80% of its maximum rating.

Most circuit breakers use a thermal/magnetic system to trip the breaker. Continuous operation close to the breakers maximum rating will cause the breaker to run warm.
 
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Old 11-28-14, 04:05 PM
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Thank you.

Re my:

#1- If the circuit breaker would "trip," if I was overloading it, what would I have to do?


If ever it did "trip," what would I have to do?
 
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Old 11-28-14, 06:38 PM
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#1- If the circuit breaker would "trip," if I was overloading it, what would I have to do?
Reduce the total load on the circuit. Unplug everything else on the breaker except the hot plate. If that didn't work try not using both burners on high at the same time.
If ever it did "trip," what would I have to do?
See preceding instructions and then turn the breaker back on.
 
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Old 11-30-14, 06:44 PM
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Thank you so much.
So if the circuit was overloaded the circuit breaker would "trip."
Does that mean the circuit breaker switch would flip/switch to the opposite side? And all I would have to do is flip/switch it back to it's original position?
 
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Old 11-30-14, 07:52 PM
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Does that mean the circuit breaker switch would flip/switch to the opposite side? And all I would have to do is flip/switch it back to it's original position?
They usually go to midway. You then need to push them to the off position then back to the on position.
 
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Old 12-02-14, 02:30 PM
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Thank you for your kind help.
(P.S. I notice I am not receiving email notices when a reply is made to my posts. (Even though I am checking "Instantly, using email")
 
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Old 12-02-14, 04:16 PM
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I am not receiving email notices when a reply is made to my posts.
Are you sure your email address in the profile is correct? Have you checked your Spambox.
 
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Old 12-02-14, 07:37 PM
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Does that mean the circuit breaker switch would flip/switch to the opposite side? And all I would have to do is flip/switch it back to it's original position?
They usually go to midway. You then need to push them to the off position then back to the on position.
Many times when a breaker trips the handle stays in the on position and it isn't immediately obvious that it has tripped. I have found it helpful to carefully run a finger down along the breaker handles to feel each breaker handle very carefully to find the loose one that is tripped. When you find the tripped breaker it is obvious. Then, reset it.
 
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