Wiring washroom


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Old 12-06-14, 08:06 PM
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Wiring washroom

Hi All, I am planning to do the washroom wiring in my basement. I hope somebody can show me a diagram for do my wiring.

My idea is the power can from the panel to the GFCI the continue to one switch for the lights and after this an other switch for the fan. Can I do this wiring with 14/2?

Please post a diagram circuit with this idea. It is possible?


Thanks in advance!!!!
 
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Old 12-06-14, 08:22 PM
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Do you mean laundry room or bathroom?

Please add Canada to the location in your profile so responders can better answer your questions.
 
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Old 12-06-14, 08:28 PM
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Washroom o powder room. Just sink and toilet.
 
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Old 12-06-14, 11:38 PM
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I thought a "powder room" WAS just a toilet and washbasin.

Mr. Awesome will have to comment on Canadian code but in the US a circuit dedicated to the toilet, wash, powder, bath room is required to be just that and not serve any other loads. Specifically, the circuit must be 20 amperes to the GFCI protected receptacle(s) in all such rooms and no other uses OR to a single room where it can also serve lighting and ventilation. Lighting, heat and ventilation fans MAY be served by other circuits but the receptacles MUST be dedicated.

My own opinion is that each bathroom should have a GFCI protected receptacle (or more than one duplex) on a circuit dedicated to that bathroom alone while the lighting and ventilation along with any heat could be served by other circuits.

The reason behind this rule is for the use of electric hair dryers and such appliances.
 
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Old 12-07-14, 06:18 AM
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Just to add at least in the US the lights and fan do not need to be GFCI and it is best that they aren't. That way if you trip a GFCI you aren't left in the dark.

Assuming you don't power the lights off another circuit and you bring power (20 amps dedicated) to the receptacle first then you would run a 2-conductor cable from the line side of the GFCI either by pigtailing (best) or using the second connection on the line side to the switch box and from the switch box to the lights and fan. You may want to use a 2-gang switch box.
 
 

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