Chime Transformer Voltge

Reply

  #1  
Old 12-14-14, 06:30 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 2
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Chime Transformer Voltge

Separated from: http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...uting-22v.html

When I bought the bits & pieces of my doorbell system the pushbutton specs said max voltage was 16 volts. My transformer identified itself on the output plate as 16 vac, 10va. Everything wired & looking good, except my voltage meter reads 22v across the transformer terminals. The pushbutton lights up intermittently, and when it doesn't light up the chime doesn't operate. I've checked out 3 different transformers and all read 22 volts tho spec'd at 16v.

Next steps, either put a resistor in line with the pushbutton, or get a different switch. Are all lit switches temperamental about 50% over-voltage? How about the new LED lit switches?

Thanks to all,
 

Last edited by ray2047; 12-14-14 at 06:59 PM.
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 12-14-14, 06:39 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 54,648
Received 517 Votes on 487 Posts
Welcome to the forums.

You can't put a resistor in the line or the doorbell won't work.
The button will work whether or not the bulb is any good.
 
  #3  
Old 12-14-14, 08:16 PM
CasualJoe's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: United States
Posts: 10,301
Received 43 Votes on 35 Posts
The pushbutton lights up intermittently, and when it doesn't light up the chime doesn't operate.
Is this an older house, maybe masonry house?
 
  #4  
Old 12-15-14, 11:38 AM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 3,764
Received 42 Votes on 40 Posts
Some doorbell transformers have more than two terminal screws so you can choose the voltage you want (from a small number of choices).

Still, the voltage might not be really accurate, being a little higher when measured with no load and maybe a little lower than spec'ed when the button is pushed and the chime plunger has been pulled down.

Too high a voltage will shorten the life of a tiny bulb that lights up the pushbutton.

The pushbutton, if illuminated, is supposed to go dark when you push it and the chime sounds.
 
  #5  
Old 12-16-14, 01:02 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 2
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
CasualJoe, the house is old but all the door bell components, including wiring, are newly installed. Stucco over frame, if it makes a difference.

AllenJ, to clarify a couple of items: The transformer has 2 terminals and is clearly marked 16 VAC. My voltage meter reads 22 VAC at the terminals. The light on the pushbutton is my indication of when the circuit is operational. If it is on and I push the button, the chime works. If the light is NOT on and I push the button, the chime does not work. I have checked the chime by shorting the switch wiring when the button light was not on, and the chime has always worked. Thus I'm fairly certain the problem is at the pushbutton. The packaging for the button indicated that the maximum specified operational voltage was 16V.

Why would three brand new 16v door chime transformers all produce 22v at the secondaries? Three different manufacturers, all from China. House line voltage on the circuit supplying the transformer reads 125V on my meter.

There is an obvious solution and that is to get a non-lighted pushbutton....
 
  #6  
Old 12-16-14, 02:18 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,597
Received 13 Votes on 11 Posts
It sounds like wiring not the transformer. The higher voltage wouldn't normally cause an intermittent open. If they used telephone wire to hook it up it is brittle and breaks easily. It could even break inside the insulation and the break be hidden. First ct the wire back as far as you can and it still be long enough and strip and try reconnecting. I'd tart with the button and test, then the other connections.

Why would three brand new 16v door chime transformers all produce 22v at the secondaries? Three different manufacturers, all from China.
But they could all be from the same factory with abysmal quality control. Then too you read some of the instructions for things they seem to think nominal voltage in the US is 110 volts.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 12-16-14 at 08:27 PM.
  #7  
Old 12-16-14, 07:28 PM
CasualJoe's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: United States
Posts: 10,301
Received 43 Votes on 35 Posts
It sounds like wiring not the transformer. The higher voltage wouldn't normally cause an intermittent open.
I have to agree with Ray, it's a wiring problem and quite possibly behind the button or even a bad button. The slightly higher voltage isn't enough to hurt anything and should just pull the plunger on the chime a little harder. I'd bet that if you check it the voltage drops quickly as the button is pushed. I originally thought that if this was an older masonry home that the wiring was imbedded in the masonry, forget that, it isn't.
 
  #8  
Old 12-17-14, 05:31 AM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 3,764
Received 42 Votes on 40 Posts
So shorting across the two pushbutton terminals always sounds the chime whether or not the button was lit?

That means the button is defective. You need another button of any description, not necessarily an unlighted button.

The 22 instead of 16 volts did not damage the button just now. It is true that the higher voltage will shorten the life of the button contacts but that is over a period of many years, not a few days. When the button light burns out the button itself will work the same as before.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: