Surge Protector with 50 foot Cable?

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  #1  
Old 12-16-14, 12:08 PM
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Surge Protector with 50 foot Cable?

I need a surge protector with at least 50 feet of cable but I can't find one anywhere. I am concerned about using a extension cord with a 25' surge protector because I'm no electrician and I'm not sure if it is safe.
Can anyone offer any insight to my solution?
Thanks.
 
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Old 12-16-14, 12:12 PM
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Use a surge suppressor at the female end of a standard cord rated for your usage.
 
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Old 12-16-14, 12:40 PM
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Is there a difference between a surge suppressor and a surge protector?
Also should the standard cord be rated for usage or the suppressor?
 
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Old 12-16-14, 05:07 PM
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What are you protecting? Why do you need a 50' extension cord? Have you calculated any voltage drop? You are protecting what is at the far end of the extension cord. No worries until it all culminates at the end where whatever it is you are protecting is sitting. The cord doesn't care about surges.
 
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Old 12-16-14, 06:32 PM
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Is there a difference between a surge suppressor and a surge protector?
No, but there is a huge difference between a surge suppressor and a surge strip. Are you looking for a surge strip with a 50 foot cord? Most surge suppressors are either point-of-use devices or whole house devices.
 
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Old 12-16-14, 09:58 PM
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What are you're planning on doing with this?

I am concerned about using a extension cord with a 25' surge protector because I'm no electrician and I'm not sure if it is safe.

Don't. It is against code to plug a relocatable power tap (power strip) into an extension cord or other relocatable power tap. It must be plugged directly into the wall.

I am thinking the o/p is confusing a surge protector for a power strip.
 
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Old 12-17-14, 06:53 AM
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Using power strips chained to each other or to extension cords may be contrary to their UL listing and/or usage instructions from the manufacturer, but it is not a code issue. Building codes deal only with wiring that is permanently affixed to or enclosed within the building ("premises wiring").

There are plenty of multi-taps that can be used with extension cords as long as the cord is properly sized for the load. I have several jobsite extension cords with 3 receptacles on the end, and a couple break-out boxes which are intended for use with extension cords.

To the OP, I think any multi-tap of reasonable quality will probably serve your purpose. My standard advise here is to avoid anything from the dollar store -- pay for a reasonable quality device and don't exceed the amperage ratings.
 
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Old 12-17-14, 07:44 AM
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Thanks for the responses guys!
I have included pictures to better describe what my intensions are.
The picture of the surge protector I planned on using is included. It is only has a 25ft cable though. I need at least 50ft.

I will research Name:  IMG_0077.jpg
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Size:  44.8 KBthis 'multi-tap' device as I have never heard of it before.
 
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Old 12-17-14, 07:48 AM
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Extension cords are for temporary use only. You need to add permanent wiring.
 
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Old 12-17-14, 07:52 AM
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I wish I had a dime for every time I saw a TV mounted over a fireplace and then the owner wondered how to get power and cables to it.
 
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Old 12-17-14, 08:19 AM
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Hmm. Maybe I just have to go behind the wall then. I was trying to avoid that altogether. Thanks anyhow for all the advice.
 
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Old 12-17-14, 08:31 AM
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How about wiremold raceway along the baseboard / corner? It can be painted to match the wall.
 
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Old 12-17-14, 09:32 AM
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It's much easier to catch the eye of it's going along the baseboard. Thank you for the recommendation though. I want to to be as "invisible" as possible.
 
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Old 12-17-14, 03:24 PM
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It's much easier to catch the eye
And an ugly extension cord is pretty?? As Ray said, you need permanent wiring, not an extension cord. You have never said what you will be doing with the cord.
 
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Old 12-17-14, 03:37 PM
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I actually made it quite clear my friend. There is a photo of my living room in which I posted above. The extension cord/surge protector cord would be placed inside the cable raceway. The raceway would be placed via adhesive on the upper wall where the wall meets the ceiling.
 
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Old 12-17-14, 03:47 PM
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The extension cord/surge protector cord would be placed inside the cable raceway.
It is a code violation to place line voltage wiring in a low voltage cableway. It is a code violation to use an extension cord in place of permanent wiring which is what that would be.
 
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Old 12-17-14, 04:11 PM
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Thank you for the advice.
 
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Old 12-17-14, 04:12 PM
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Since you can't do it, it is a moot point, but why would you run the cable around the world to get to the TV? A simple hardwire from the lower right receptacle to the TV location would suffice. Yeah, it would take a little sheetrock work and paint, but it would be code compliant and look better than a raceway along the ceiling.
 
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Old 12-17-14, 04:27 PM
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Because I'm no electrician and running cable behind the actually wall seemed as if it would be very difficult and time consuming. I'm also not sure what you mean by a "simple hardwire from the lower right receptacle" as I'm not familiar with electrician terms.
I've only been a home owner 2 years and this "home improvement" stuff is still fairly new to me.

Edit: Just googled receptacle. Turns out it's a outlet....
I'm still in the process of learning all these terms.
 

Last edited by Bekrah; 12-17-14 at 04:55 PM.
  #20  
Old 12-17-14, 04:53 PM
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I was looking to save some money but now I think I'm just going to call my local power company and see what they would charge me to have someone come out and install a electrical outlet behind my wall mounted TV.
Thanks again to those who provided constructive feedback.
 
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Old 12-17-14, 05:05 PM
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We can walk you through the details a step at a time but here is a summary:

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Old 12-17-14, 05:13 PM
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Your local power company supplies power to the house. They stop at the meter. If you want to hire this out you would call an electrical contractor.

You can get surge protection receptacles that go in the box.

BTW, the correct term is receptacle. Outlet includes things like light fixtures or any other place power is used.
 
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Old 12-18-14, 06:16 AM
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Since you are calling an electrician, then also have him install a surge protector that actually does surge protection from surges that do damage. Remains functional for decades. Costs about $1 per protected appliance. This completely different device, also called a surge protector, is located where wires enter a building. And is the only solution found in any facility that cannot have damage.

If protection of a TV is required, then you need protection of all clocks, CFL bulbs, the furnace, smoke detectors, bathroom GFCI, computer, recharging mobile phone, door bell, clock radios, and dishwasher. What protects them? That power strip does not even claim to protect a TV from a type of surge that might damage a TV. A plug-in protector will not absorb surges that are maybe hundreds of thousands of joules (read its specification numbers). And may even fail on a surge too tiny to overwhelm protection already inside any TV.

That is a protector. No protector does protection. Protection is a completely different item that harmlessly absorbs hundreds of thousands of joules. An effective protector makes a low impedance (ie 'less than 10 foot') connection to protection. Only a 'whole house' protector does that. Did I mention an undersized power strip protector (with so few joules) has even created house fires?

Does that TV connect to a TV cable? Best protection for cable TV is a hardwire, also attached to the same earth ground, that also must make a low impedance (ie 'less than 10 foot') connection. A protector installed by an electrician would only do what a hardwire does better: connect low impedance to single point earth ground. What should have most of your attention? The item that acutally absorbs hundreds of thousands of joules. A protector is only as effective as its earth ground ... which that power strip protector does not have and will not discuss.
 
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