Breaker Panel 1/2 knock-out retention options

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Old 12-19-14, 01:58 PM
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Breaker Panel 1/2 knock-out retention options

Is it OK to use the non-metallic style cable connectors inside a breaker panel rather than the metal clamp down type for securing 14-2, 12-2, etc..

https://www.platt.com/CutSheets/Rack-A-Tiers/13.pdf

Like the TT500 in the above link, or the Fastab RCR-50 style NM-B connectors?

What do you do when you have a stud wall and need to come in from the side of the panel. I don't want to use too big of a hole in the stud, seems like these would be a good option.. Do people run into any building code problems with them? Which way do you point the one-way tab that is inside them securing to the Romex, should you be able to pull wire out of the box or into the box easier?

Thanks!

Jeff
 
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Old 12-19-14, 02:16 PM
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All the cables should enter the top or bottom of the panel. Since you are covering up many side knockouts.... you'll want to use cable connectors where you can put two cables in one connector and knockout.

My personal preference is the Arlington NM940 plastic connector. Inexpensive, easy to use, durable and widely available.

gexpro/medias/gexproimages/8949921284126.pdf

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Old 12-19-14, 02:19 PM
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Full length studs typically run down both sides of the panel. Using the top or bottom ko's is much easier.
 
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Old 12-19-14, 02:34 PM
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I am upgrading a panel and will not have enough existing cable length to route to the top or bottom. There are knock-outs at the bottom on the side that are mostly at the bottom so I was going to use these for two cables through the stud..

Does this mean I need to put in a access box and "create" enough length so it can come in the top or bottom?
 
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Old 12-19-14, 02:41 PM
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It would be easier to add a junction box to add more cable to allow the reroute.
 
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Old 12-19-14, 02:43 PM
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Here are the pictures of the old and new panel, the old panel is tiny and the new panel has some access knockouts on the side near the bottom that I wanted to use. There is a 14-2 and an 8-2 that I wanted to feed through the stud. I'd align the holes so I can use the plastic knockouts.
 
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Old 12-19-14, 02:50 PM
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I'm pretty sure I can align the hole in the stud to get the cable to route through the two holes shown in the picture.. Will it fail an inspection if I do this? I think this will be easier than adding a junction box, but if it 'aint code, I'll do it..
 
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Old 12-19-14, 03:06 PM
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You are going to need a hole about 1 1/4 or larger for the connectors. Doesn't leave much meat in the stud. Is the wall load bearing?
 
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Old 12-19-14, 03:39 PM
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You are going to need a hole about 1 1/4 or larger for the connectors. Doesn't leave much meat in the stud. Is the wall load bearing?
This is what it would look like on a test stud with two 7/8" spade holes.. Yes, the wall is partially load bearing, it supports a floor above it but not a wall or roof. I've cut into the floor above it so I can see that the floor joists are not terminating at this wall so if it fell out completely, the other walls would take over and prevent collapse.. The code book I have suggests that a load bearing wall can support 40% holes, so that is 1.4" max.
 
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Old 12-19-14, 04:48 PM
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Those few holes should not present a problem.

There is one important thing to keep in mind here. Anywhere you drill thru a stud should be a nailplate. It doesn't matter if the holes are in the center of the studs.... nailplate them around the panel. That includes the sill plate at the top and bottom of that bay.

Halex 1-1/2 in. X 5 in. Nail Plates - The Home Depot
 
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Old 12-19-14, 05:14 PM
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It looks like you could route those cables behind the one stud and come into the bottom of the panel. Just pull the cable out of the one stud.
 
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