Beginner Soldering Projects

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  #1  
Old 12-21-14, 11:36 AM
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Beginner Soldering Projects

Hi,
I am soon going to be getting a soldering iron,
I was wondering what easy projects I can attempt to do for fun, and practice.

Thanks.
 
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Old 12-21-14, 05:04 PM
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Your post is sort of like saying "I just bought a hammer". Do you have a specific question about using a soldering iron? Just like hammers they range in side from a sledge hammer to a tiny jewelers hammer. You could be soldering heavy stained glass windows to doing SMD electronics repair.
 
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Old 12-21-14, 05:12 PM
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The masked solder man is relatively new to the board and is curious about electronic design. Based on your other threads it would be a good idea to purchase a kit. Places like Radio Shack actually have them in store. There are many online places that carry board kits. A good one to get for your first time might be this USB board kit. Jameco is a name brand company.

USB Charger Kit with 5V Output (Power Supplies): Jameco Kitpro
 
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Old 12-21-14, 05:29 PM
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PJmax comes to the rescue yet AGAIN!
Thanks man, I checked it out and like it.
But I found a cool little instructable on how to build a solar powered one, and it was really easy to understand.

It wasn't a kit, and in total the parts came out to about $20.

Im still brushing up on transistors and resistors (I know nothing) so im trying to devote some time to sit down and understand them.

Im thinking of trying this kit, then maybe the instructable later.

Thanks.
 
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Old 12-21-14, 05:36 PM
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Im heading to Radioshack
(did you know here in Canada, Radioshack goes as "The Source"?, It's the exact same company.)
On tuesday to get a soldering iron and some rosin core solder.

I'll check out their kits first.
Anything else you think I might need to pick up for my soldering adventures over there while i'm at it?
 
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Old 12-21-14, 05:40 PM
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There is so much you can get. Fine wire cutters, needle nose pliers but start with the soldering iron and solder.
 
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Old 12-21-14, 05:47 PM
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Ok thanks
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  #8  
Old 12-22-14, 02:29 AM
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Hi masked,
As with so many skills, it is practice that improves your results. As for what to practice on, pick up a basic electronics book and then scavenge the discarded electronics for all of the components you need. So much electronics is thrown away every day that finding the basic transistors and resistors to unsolder and assemble into a beginner project should be easy. Add in the internet to help identify what you find and it would be a good start.

enjoy
Bud
 
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Old 12-22-14, 04:41 AM
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If you have not yet purchased your soldering iron I would look at what you want to do. Many newer components are more sensitive to heat so a iron with adjustable temperature and can accurately hold temperature can help. Through hole parts are relatively easy to work with but most components these days are surface mount which can require different shaped tips for your iron.
 
  #10  
Old 12-22-14, 05:45 AM
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Since you want to solder and learn electronics a good way to practice is to bring a solid state pinball machine back to life. Those from the 70's can be a bargain if bought not working. There are good tutorials and how-to guides online that walk you step-by-step through the testing and repair process allowing you to fix everything on the machine. Everything on the circuit boards are discrete (individual) components with few integrated circuit chips. The components are large for easy handling and relatively forgiving of heat. Perfect for honing your repair skills. Then, when you're done you have a working machine for home or sell it for a profit and you've learned a bit about electronics.
 
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Old 12-22-14, 07:47 AM
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Ok, thanks Pilot Dane,
i'll consider it.
 
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