Proper spot for tandem breakers

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  #1  
Old 12-31-14, 11:14 AM
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Proper spot for tandem breakers

According to this label, would it be the locations where the "----" are? Looks like it says it's OK for two .5" breakers.

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Old 12-31-14, 11:41 AM
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Slots 15, 17, 18, 19 and 20 and the corresponding slots on the right can accept a tandem.
 
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Old 12-31-14, 02:47 PM
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And since that is a Crouse-Hinds panel the proper breakers are Murray brand.
 
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Old 12-31-14, 02:50 PM
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Thanks guys for the help.
 
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Old 12-31-14, 07:44 PM
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According to this label, would it be the locations where the "----" are?
I would say yes to that. Is there a listing higher up on the label that lists acceptable breaker manufacturers and types? Unless I am mistaken, Crouse-Hinds never made a tandem breaker and only made the 1/2" thin breakers with a hook that attached to the bus stab. It took two separate catalog numbers to have a pair of thin breakers to mount adjacent to one another; one with a left hook and one with a right hook. I also seem to remember that some Crouse-Hinds panels allowed Siemens QP, GE THQL and Bryant BR (C-H BR now) breakers.
 
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Old 12-31-14, 11:50 PM
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Crouse-Hinds made regular tandems before the half-hook stab clip version. Same part number as today's Murray (MP1515 and MP2020).

Good point about the other vendors. Lots of Bryant BR's are seen in these old panels.

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Old 01-03-15, 04:31 PM
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Here is the top half of the label:




Is it OK to have wire nuts inside a breaker box (if you needed to make a line longer for example)?
 
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Old 01-03-15, 04:58 PM
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Splices are allowed in the panel.
 
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Old 01-11-15, 05:00 PM
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Just went to HD and bought a couple tandem breakers, although I bought the 'U' suffix instead of the 'N', and I need the 'N'. As you know, the 'U' has an extra little piece of plastic / metal on it to keep it from being installed (on my panel). I kind of want modify it myself (don't worry I won't). I can't see why the 'N' ones would be double the cost. The ones that are in there already 'N'.
 
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Old 01-11-15, 05:53 PM
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Some tandems are for replacement use only and do not have the rejection foot. This should not be used in CTL panels.
 
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Old 01-11-15, 06:30 PM
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Nevermind, I'm an idiot. I judged the book by its cover. I removed one of the tandems that was in there and saw that it was the unrestricted version, so I assumed that's what it needed... not so. The tandem spots on the main strip (not sure what the real name for this is) are notched out to accept the U version of the breakers. So I'm all set.
 
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Old 01-11-15, 08:42 PM
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The slot is the rejection feature to limit the number and placement of tandems. You have a CTL class panel.

CTL circuit tandem limiting.
 
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Old 01-12-15, 08:13 AM
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I can't see why the 'N' ones would be double the cost.
The "N" version is a non-CTL breaker and should only be used as replacements in pre 1968 panels. They are more expensive because there are new manufactured compared to the "U" CTL version. BTW, CTL means Circuit Total Limiting to limit the total number of poles to no more than the panel was designed and approved to have. To use the "N" version in your panel would be a code violation, but I have yet to see an inspector call anyone on using them.

Non-CTL replacement only

Circuitboards and panelboards built prior to 1965 do not have circuit total limiting devices or features built-in. Even so, pre-CTL circuit breakers "for replacement use only"[2] are still sold in local hardware stores. As a result, numerous unsafe situations have resulted where panels were dangerously overloaded because these non-CTL breakers continue to be used.[citation needed] With overuse of non-CTL breakers, current is being placed on the panel's bus-bars in excess of the designed capacity of that panel.

The 2008 code did away with the previous 42 circuit limitation on panelboards.[3] One can now order panelboards with as many as 84 circuit places, and a corresponding ampacity rating. If a panelboard with a sufficient number of breaker positions is installed in the first place, the need for non-CTL breakers should be eliminated.
Circuit total limitation - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
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