Hello - my first Q; Dishwasher on shared circuit


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Old 01-02-15, 06:38 PM
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Hello - my first Q; Dishwasher on shared circuit

Just bought a house in NJ and joined this Forum seeking help and looking forward to help when I can.

I have a question as I am re-doing some minor electrical connections.
My new dishwasher specifies total of 10.5A load max....and it is currently on its own circuit (20A).
I have seen manuals and others recommending keeping DW on a dedicated circuit but if I would like to add another appliance that draws max 6A, I really see no reason why not.

Are there any code requirements or otherwise benefits to keeping it on its own circuit ??

Thanks!
 
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Old 01-02-15, 07:09 PM
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Welcome to the forums!

210.23 (A)(2)(2011) Utilization equipment fastened in place. The total rating of equipment fastened in place, other then luminaires, shall not exceed 50 percent of the branch circuit ampere rating where lighting units, cord and plug connected equipment not fastened in place, or both are supplied.

So, since your dishwasher is over 50% of the branch circuit rating (20 amps) it can not share the circuit with other cord and plug equipment not fastened in place.

What other appliance are you looking to add?
 
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Old 01-02-15, 07:39 PM
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thanks for the replay.
I only wanted to link it with my stove (gas stove)....it uses only about 4A...also currently on its own circuit....which is just silly IMO.
Weird rule that equipment which is fastened must use only 50% of the capacity.... what does it have to do with electricity ?
 
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Old 01-02-15, 07:56 PM
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You would be better off leaving dishwasher on a dedicated circuit. The range doesn't require a dedicated circuit.
So the question is: What do you want to do with the range circuit? Power a microwave?
 
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Old 01-02-15, 08:45 PM
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The gas stove can be on one of the countertop circuits.
 
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Old 01-02-15, 11:01 PM
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the place is a bit of a mess....First thing I did after moving in, was to get electricians to upgrade the panel to 200A from 100A....but of course all the original wires / circuits lay-outs are still the same.
The house was built with 60A panel and over the years the previous owners were adding stuff at random...so it seems.
Fridge, stove, microwave and dishwasher are all on their own circuits...meantime I have all lights and outlets in LR, 3 BRs and Bathroom on a single circuit.
Time to clean it up and re-wire and distribute the loads evenly with future in mind.
 
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Old 01-03-15, 12:47 AM
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It is not uncommon to use the dishwasher circuit to also power a garbage disposal. The theory is that the the two will never be used at the same time.
 
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Old 01-03-15, 05:18 AM
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With a 200 amp panel, it's time to start pulling cable to areas that need it, rather than sacrificing circuits that are already installed.
If you have an attic or basement/crawlspace, it makes the job easier. You can post here for some tips.
One tip is to invest in some fiberglass rods. The rods come in 5' sections.

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Old 01-03-15, 07:28 AM
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Weird rule that equipment which is fastened must use only 50% of the capacity.... what does it have to do with electricity ?
The reason is that if you have equipment that is fastened in place it is normally larger use equipment. When you have that with other portable plug and cord equipment, you may overload the circuit.
 
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Old 01-03-15, 08:27 AM
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This is just a side note, it will only apply to a few.
I had to add a dedicated circuit for the gas range. It's convection and has two 120V heating elements, One in the fan and one in the warming drawer.
 
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Old 01-03-15, 08:27 AM
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I can see the intend was good but still illogical.
My refrigerator draws twice as much as my oven which is of course fastened unlike the fridge....not to mention my stereo equipment which has its own 20A circuit and pulls about 12A.
I think the code should make the call solely on the merits of how many Amps a piece of equipment is pulling and not how big it is or how it is fastened / attached / or free standing.

Nevertheless I appreciate the input....wouldn't want to get in trouble with the inspector.

Handyone - this is true and will be looking for some advice but I still will have to distribute loads more evenly on a few of the circuits...
 
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Old 01-03-15, 10:08 AM
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Good deal,
My only point was that with a 200 amp panel, dedicated circuits are the least of your concerns.
You have power O' plenty.
If you're looking for a quick fix, and want to use range circuit for other, more immediate needs, I say go for it.
Feed the range from counter/small appliance circuit, and use the range circuit elsewhere.
 
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Old 01-03-15, 10:15 AM
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I do not like to give advice contrary to the code, but I don't really see any harm adding the gas stove with the dishwasher either.

..not to mention my stereo equipment which has its own 20A circuit and pulls about 12A.
The stereo is not a fastened in place cord and plug equipment. Add that to the dishwasher circuit and you will overload the circuit. This is what the code is trying to avoid.
 
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Old 01-03-15, 11:11 AM
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It is not uncommon to use the dishwasher circuit to also power a garbage disposal. The theory is that the the two will never be used at the same time.
In theory, yes. But in reality. That's how I did mine, but the wife uses it in tandem with DW.
 
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Old 01-03-15, 11:15 AM
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Is your dishwasher 50% of the circuit?
 
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Old 01-03-15, 11:31 AM
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Beats the hell out of me.
 
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Old 01-03-15, 05:32 PM
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we both agree Tolyn.... at this point I am rather ranting about the code

.... I put my stereo on 20A dedicated circuit knowing how much power it draws.... I don't see how the code is helping prevent any issues by saying what it does about the fastened devices.... I am happy to calculate Amps from various devices and make the choices accordingly and not just believe that since my 10A dishwasher is fastened then it can't share a circuit with a stove that draws mere 3Amps.

I would be making bigger mistake by running an iron or a blender on the the same line as my stereo as that would be hitting total of 20A and overloading the circuit and yet none of the devices are fastened to anything.
 
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Old 01-04-15, 07:07 AM
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yet none of the devices are fastened to anything.
Correct. So they could be easily moved to a different circuit.
 
 

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