Wire splicing/soldering inquiry

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  #1  
Old 01-10-15, 10:33 AM
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Wire splicing/soldering inquiry

I'm not too savvy/experienced with soldering. I want to splice the spark plug wire which goes to the coil on a small engine, to lengthen it using another piece of the same type wire. The following picture (shown below) shows what I'm working with and have on hand to use. Shows the coil, the other piece of wire, some solder I found, and two identical 23w soldering irons. My plan, after soldering, in regard insulating the splice in the wire (following a suggestion by someone else) is to use either silicone to make a very thick layer over the top, or to do a quicker method (allowing not having to wait for the silicone to cure) which is to use hotmelt glue which then allows the insulation to be completed and ready for use in less than five minutes. And I do happen to have a hotmelt glue gun.
Here are my questions:
1. What might be a proper/neat way to splice the wires together? Maybe just strip the insulation on the other piece there the same as the already one stripped, then lay the bare wire on both parallel which eachother then heat up the wires together with the soldering iron then start touching/adding the solder to the wires joined together until it finally melts/flows and makes the soldered bond?
2. Seems like I never had much luck in the past using those soldering irons because they aren't very powerful at 23w. But maybe they'd be sufficient for this job. They haven't been taken care of properly, tips probably need to be cleaned or whatever. I guess you do that by heating them up and then wiping with steel wool?
Any comments/advice for accomplishing this one-time project appreciated.

 
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  #2  
Old 01-10-15, 10:56 AM
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Use a moist sponge to clean a soldering iron tip. Then immediately add fresh solder to re-plate the tip.

That wire will have like an oily substance in it and will be hard to solder.
 
  #3  
Old 01-10-15, 11:15 AM
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If there's oily substance in that wire that will make it hard to solder, maybe not a good idea to try then? Maybe just use crimp type connector (or a different suggestion otherwise).

If there is any oily substance on the wire it certainly isn't apparent at least visually. Looks like standard stranded wire to me, not unusual looking. So this has to be a complicated ordeal then? or what
 

Last edited by sgull; 01-10-15 at 12:41 PM.
  #4  
Old 01-11-15, 05:01 AM
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You can use butt splice connectors, found at an auto supply or HD.
 
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Old 01-11-15, 06:02 AM
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I doubt that Hot glue or silicone will have enough di electric strength and will arc through,check this link out maybe you can contact their tech support for suggestions,don't waste your time soldering.
NGK Spark Plug Wire Splice At Parker Yamaha Com.
Geo
 
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Old 01-11-15, 08:37 AM
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I doubt that Hot glue or silicone will have enough di electric strength and will arc through,check this link out maybe you can contact their tech support for suggestions,don't waste your time soldering.
NGK Spark Plug Wire Splice At Parker Yamaha Com.
Yeah Geo I tried soldering anyway. Couldn't even get the solder to melt; the wire didn't seem to want to heat up enough with either those low-wattage irons I have. Or maybe indeed it was the mysterious invisible "oily substance" on the wires which prevented soldering. Anyway, 12 minutes of my life wasted there. I ended up just using a butt splice connector; I had that in mind when I mentioned "crimp type connector" in post 3 here, but butt splice connector is the accurate name (I used one exactly like shown the link provided by Rick Johnston's post this thread). Then, I went ahead used hot melt glue on the joint. It's just one spark plug wire on a small engine and the wire splice is up several inches away from anything. It's in a visible enough location where I think it there was an arcing through issue I could see it. I think it should be fine at least for this one particular application. I do like that spark plug wire splice at the link you provided, though. That would be nice and neat and probably a much better solution all around. I might go ahead and get one (after, per your suggestion, I check with their tech support and see what they have to say too).
 
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