Approved splice kit for behind wall??

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Old 01-10-15, 12:30 PM
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Approved splice kit for behind wall??

Is there an approved splice kit for splicing two 12/2 cables together. Wall section (perpendicular section) was removed and now have to reconnect two receptacles together and cables are cut short where the wall was removed.

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Old 01-10-15, 12:35 PM
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The splices must remain accessible and cannot be buried in the wall.

You either need to open the wall up further and replace the short cable or use an electrical box with blank cover. The box could be mounted to an existing stud.

You may have to use two boxes and add a piece in between.
 
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Old 01-10-15, 12:54 PM
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I had found these HERE that say they are approved for behind wall splicing thus not needing a junction box. It states NEC code 334.40B in article and NEC states

Am I interpretting this correctly? Are they wrong in stating they are approved for behind the wall? Not questioning you just verifying my findings.

334.40 (B) Devices of Insulating Material. Self-contained switches,
self-contained receptacles, and nonmetallic-sheathed cable interconnector
devices of insulating material that are listed shall be
permitted to be used without boxes in exposed cable wiring and
for repair wiring in existing buildings where the cable is concealed.
Openings in such devices shall form a close fit around
the outer covering of the cable, and the device shall fully enclose
the part of the cable from which any part of the covering has
been removed. Where connections to conductors are by bindingscrew
terminals, there shall be available as many terminals as
conductors.
 
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Old 01-10-15, 12:55 PM
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As far as I know, there is no approved method of splicing class I wiring inside of a wall, aside from that, it is both dangerous and begging for failure.
As posted above, you can use junction boxes (he or she suggested using what is called a "nail on" or "new work" box, if the wall is no longer opened up to access the wall studs, use a "old work" or "cut in" box, this is a type of junction box that as little tabs connected to screws that when turned, flange out the tabs, mounting the box.)
The better option would be, turn off the circuit, get some 12/2 romex cable and firmly tape it to each of the existing cables and use the old cables as sort of a pull string to get the new cable to the existing locations, then junction where the original cables were junctioned. Doing it this way eliminates adding unsightly junction boxes, but is definitely the harder option. If you don't mind the look of a blank cover on your wall, do as suggested before me.

The reason you don't ever want to bury a junction in the wall is because it is a splice - splices fail. If that splice fails, it'll take a sledge hammer on your wall to fix the thing. It is dangerous because if not spliced using proper wiring methods, it can be weak, loose. Loose connections, under load, create heat, heat creates fire. Since this splice is buried in the wall, and the smoke is most likely going straight to the attic, you probably won't smell it and your smoke detectors won't detect it until your studs are on fire, and your house is destroyed.
I'm a licensed electrician and see the first few steps of a electrical fire all the time. This scenario is not as common as others, but still, it happens and it is not worth saving a few bucks. If you are not confident with your ability to wire, don't do it. Or worse, if you are confident but incompetent, REALLY don't do it, that's where the fires and electrocutions start.
To have a professional do it, it'll probably be in the $80-$130 range, most have free estimates. $130 is worth less than your life and your house, I promise.
 
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Old 01-10-15, 02:00 PM
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Those splice kits are approved and may gain popularity in the future. But I would go on the advice of a journeyman electrician first and see how the splice kits work in the future. I think that advice was provided above. In the 70's, someone had an idea to wire houses with aluminum wiring and it didn't turn out well.

If the wall is still open it shouldn't be hard to run a new cable down. If it's closed up, use the J-box, or you can still fish a cable down using a few techniques. I find it much easier to just cut out old box you're fishing to and replace it with an old work box. Cutting out existing box gives you plenty of room to get a cable down.
 
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Old 01-10-15, 02:31 PM
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The better option would be, turn off the circuit, get some 12/2 romex cable and firmly tape it to each of the existing cables and use the old cables as sort of a pull string to get the new cable to the existing locations...
Only problem with this method is that most wiring is stapled to the studs before the wall covering (drywall) is installed and also fastened within 6 inches of any box. This makes pulling new cable with the old utterly impossible.
 
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Old 01-10-15, 03:00 PM
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I had found these HERE that say they are approved for behind wall splicing thus not needing a junction box. It states NEC code 334.40B in article and NEC states
The Tyco splice is approved by U.L., but I wouldn't recommend it unless it was perhaps a last resort which I doubt it is. Before you use one, I'd suggest you contact your local AHJ and see if they will accept them, some won't.
 
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Old 01-10-15, 03:50 PM
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Although approved for use behind walls, I still don't feel warm and fuzzy using them. I HAVE used a few splicing in open chimney chases, knowing I had "hand" access through a receptacle mounted close to the splice, where I could pull the old work box and grab it with my hands with enough slack to make repairs. I would have used the receptacle box as a JB, but my splice was in a switch loop, so it wouldn't work.
 
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Old 01-12-15, 07:02 AM
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I also don't feel really optimistic about the longevity of these connectors. My understanding is that they were invented for quickly & cheaply assembling wall segments of prefab housing, and the original acceptance in the code about a decade ago only allowed those connectors in manufactured houses. They have since expanded to allow them in other construction types. Historically the manufactured housing industry has not been great on long-term quality or safety as it is really driven entirely by lowest initial construction cost, and I don't expect these types of connectors to be any different.
 
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Old 01-12-15, 07:06 AM
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Good point, Ben. I do see them mostly when marrying the two halves of modulars, but they are under the structure, and not inside the walls to much. That is why I cautiously use them, and allow retrieval points, or don't use them at all.
 
 

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