Converting a 240-volt circuit to 120-volt


  #1  
Old 01-26-15, 05:51 AM
B
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: United States
Posts: 5
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Converting a 240-volt circuit to 120-volt

I currently have a line that was ran to my kitchen that is a 30 amp 240-volt circuit that was ran with 10/3 wire. I am replacing the electric stove top with gas stove top that only needs a 120-volt circuit so I don't need the 240-volt circuit at the moment.

Since the line is already ran to the cabinet I am wanting to find out if I can use the same double pole 30 am circuit and the 10/3 wire to wire a standard outlet. I could use a shared common ground then break the tab on the outlet and connect the black to the top and the red to the bottom.

I also considered using this line to run some outlets for my shop below to power my table saw and other smaller tools. I am trying to do something like this circuit that I found in the Black and Decker wiring book.

Name:  circuit.jpg
Views: 3626
Size:  25.7 KB

If this should work then one question that I have is what kind of receptacles should I use? I am not sure if there are 30 amp receptacles that use a standard 3-prong plug or if I can safely use a smaller rated receptacle?

I have an old pushmatic electrical panel that I plan on replacing for a 200 amp box. I want to avoid purchasing any different sized breakers for this box since they are expensive and I'll be changing it soon. I just need to get a line for the stove installed now and am trying to evaluate my options.

Thanks
 
  #2  
Old 01-26-15, 06:20 AM
pcboss's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 13,989
Received 202 Upvotes on 176 Posts
General purpose receptacles are limited to 20 amps maximum so you will need to change the breaker.

Kitchen countertop receptacles require gfi protection.
 
  #3  
Old 01-26-15, 06:26 AM
I
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Near Lansing, Michigan
Posts: 9,785
Upvotes: 0
Received 45 Upvotes on 43 Posts
For the time being I see two decent solutions. First one is very simple, just use the existing circuit for your table saw. Second one would be to install a small subpanel in an accessible location and use this wire as the feeder for it. You could then run a circuit or two to the kitchen and one or two to the shop.

Any other solution would require replacement of the double 30A breaker in the Bulldog panel.

Or just leave it as is and pull some new 20A circuits back to the main if/when you need them.
 
  #4  
Old 01-26-15, 06:51 AM
B
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: United States
Posts: 5
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Second one would be to install a small subpanel in an accessible location and use this wire as the feeder for it.
Thanks for the advice, if I install a subpanel, can this be grounded back to the main panel or does it need its own ground?
 
  #5  
Old 01-26-15, 07:07 AM
I
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Near Lansing, Michigan
Posts: 9,785
Upvotes: 0
Received 45 Upvotes on 43 Posts
As long as it is in the same building as the main panel, the 4-wire feeder (hot-hot-neutral-ground) is all you need for proper power and grounding. The ground and neutral bars must be kept separate in the subpanel.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: