Question on running electric to the backyard

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  #1  
Old 01-26-15, 09:44 PM
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Question on running electric to the backyard

Hello Everyone,

I have a sub-panel in my basement and need to run a few branch circuits to the outside. I'm planning on building a shed and I also need some lighting, etc... I'm in the process of finishing my basement and before I close my walls/ceilings, I wanted to run the wire. So I was considering running a branch circuit to a receptacle on the outside and then I figure I could use that receptacle to branch off in the future. My question ... What kind of cable do I need to run from the panel? If the receptacle were attached the back of my house and placed in a outdoor rated conduit/housing, can I run romex? I'll probably be using conduit to protect any wire I burry and bring out to the yard. Is there a better way of approaching this ? Thank you
 
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Old 01-26-15, 10:03 PM
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As long as there is no exposed jacket to the outdoors..... you can run NM (romex) cable from the panel to the weatherproof box. Running PVC out and underground is a good idea.

Mod Note: NM cannot be used on the outside of the house,even if in conduit. Outside in conduit is considered a wet area.

What will you be putting in the shed ? Will one circuit be enough.
 

Last edited by pcboss; 01-27-15 at 05:22 AM. Reason: clarification
  #3  
Old 01-26-15, 10:08 PM
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If you want lights in the new shed, you probably have to use a sub panel, in the shed not a receptacle I'm in NY but I only remember part of the code which is, if you are in the 5 boros, you can't use Romex.
 
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Old 01-26-15, 11:11 PM
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I'm in Suffolk county, I'll have to check the local regulations. I wasn't aware that I had install another sub-panel. The main purpose of the circuits are for lighting and receptacles. I will most likely be running two circuits out there as there will eventually be two sheds. So I was thinking about running one to a receptacle and the other directly to a junction box. That way I can close up my ceiling/walls and branch off when I'm ready. Thank you for the responses.
 
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Old 01-27-15, 06:15 AM
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At least you can use Romex in Suffolk. IIRC, the basic codes is that the sub panel has to be 5' above the ground. There can't be any exposed Romex in the garage. You would probably need #8 cable, depending on the distance it travels along with how many amps, in it. There are other codes on what is used under ground.
 
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Old 01-27-15, 06:52 AM
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A subpanel would only be required if you wish to have multiple circuits in the shed. If you only want one circuit then a panel is not required. You would only need a single switch where the underground circuit enters the shed to serve as a "building disconnect". There is also a way to do two circuits configured in a multiwire branch circuit and still not require a subpanel, but the wiring is a little more complicated.
 
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Old 01-27-15, 07:13 AM
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As long as there is no exposed jacket to the outdoors..... you can run NM (romex) cable from the panel to the weatherproof box. Running PVC out and underground is a good idea.

Mod Note: NM cannot be used on the outside of the house,even if in conduit. Outside in conduit is considered a wet area.
The receptacle outside should be a weather resistant GFCI type covered with an in-use or bubble cover.
 
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Old 01-28-15, 09:57 PM
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Thanks for all of the responses. I have had an opportunity to measure the distance but I'm guessing about 150' from the box, to the where the run will end. I'm considering using 8AWG THHN in conduit? Would that make sense for 20 amp receptacles? Thanks again
 
  #9  
Old 01-29-15, 04:56 AM
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If your intent is to upsize the wire to reduce voltage drop, I wouldn't increase it to more than #10.
 
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