Adding recessed lights to switched outlets


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Old 01-30-15, 06:38 PM
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Adding recessed lights to switched outlets

Hi,
I would appreciate some direction with adding recessed lights in my bedroom. Currently, I have two switches that control the power on the upper half of 4 bedroom outlets for lamps. I want to add 4 recessed lights to these switches but am unsure how all of these will tie in together. Most importantly, I want the two switches to control the recessed lights. I have a friend who is an electrician and will do all final connections but I want to get all the wiring ran to appropriate locations before I have him come over to finish. Any help is greatly appreciated!!
 
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Old 01-30-15, 06:49 PM
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Welcome to the forums! From one of the receptacles, you will need to run a cable to your new lighting locations and daisy chain the cable to each one. Do you have access to the ceiling area from above?
 
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Old 01-30-15, 06:56 PM
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Thank you for the quick response! Yes, I do have attic access so this shouldn't be an issue. When daisy chaining together, will I be done at the fourth light or do I need to run a wire back from the fourth light to the first to create a continuous loop? I appreciate your help!!!
 
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Old 01-30-15, 07:03 PM
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Nope. You are done at the last light. White to white, Black to black and grounds to grounds/green
 
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Old 01-30-15, 07:06 PM
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You rock! I Don't think I will be catching your post count anytime soon Chandler
 
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Old 01-30-15, 07:13 PM
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When you say you have 2 switches that control 4 receptacles, are the 2 switches separated by distance? In other words, 3-way switches?
This changes nothing Chandler said and this is one of the easiest ways to add lights to a room.

I just want to make sure the 2 switches don't control 2 different banks or groups of outlets.
 
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Old 01-30-15, 07:19 PM
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The two switches are about 12 feet apart and control the same outlets.
 
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Old 01-30-15, 08:04 PM
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Is it safe to add a junction box in the attic where I can splice in the lights to one of the wires going to a receptacle? Would make life easier than trying to fish wires down to one of the receptacles.
 
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Old 01-30-15, 08:16 PM
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where I can splice in the lights to one of the wires
It won't work off one wire (a single conductor) you need two wires but I suspect you mean cable (two or more conductors in a metallic or non metallic sheath). It can be done but how depends on if power comes in at the receptacle or the switch. Note also you will probably need two junction boxes unless you have a foot or more slack in the cable. They will be placed about a foot apart with a jumper cable between them.
 
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Old 01-30-15, 08:26 PM
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Yes cable, not wire, is what I meant.
 
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Old 01-30-15, 08:35 PM
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Next step is to determine the actual wiring at each switch box. How many two conductor cables (black, white) and how many 3-conductor cables (white, red, black), how they are connected, and are there a group of two or more white wires in a switch box connected only to each other.
 
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Old 01-30-15, 09:23 PM
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If you want to make this easy, here's what to do and some background info.

- When you add the lights, both the lights and receptacles will be switched. This is the easiest way.

- You will be pulling a new cable into the attic from one of the switched receptacle boxes. It doesn't matter which one, but you want to choose one that has no insulation in walls and is easily accessed from above once you are in attic.

- You can drill an additional hole in wall top plate above receptacle box. This will make fishing down a cable easier.

- There are ways to cut out an existing box without any wall damage. Box will be replaced with an old work box. This is what I would do as it makes fishing very easy. Post back if you need tips on that. One tip is to take note of all wire connections before disconnecting wires.
 
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Old 01-31-15, 05:03 AM
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I Don't think I will be catching your post count anytime soon
Post count means I ask a lot of questions prepping the answers from people more knowledgeable than me.
 
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Old 01-31-15, 07:09 AM
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I wanted to add you can also keep your switched receptacles and add the lights, that takes some doing. New switches will need to be added and more cable pulled.
 
 

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