(Electricity For) A lean to laundry room


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Old 02-06-15, 07:46 PM
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(Electricity For) A lean to laundry room

I am thinking of putting together a lean to on the side of the building to have a new laundry area.

Basically a washer, a dryer, light source and a receptacle.

This will be done with a buried PVC conduit about a 30" run.

Dryer will need three #10 conductors - two hots for 240V and a ground.
Washer will need three #12 conductors - one hot one neutral one ground.
Another circuit for light and receptacle - one hot one neutral one ground.

I do have hot water on the other side of that wall, so providing hot water is not an issue so no need to wire for a water heater for the laundry.

So three #10 conductors, six #12 conductors, what size PVC conduit should I use? 1.5"? 2"?

Should I just run three #6 conductors and put in a subpanel? Or run all the conductors I need for all these devices?
 
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Old 02-06-15, 08:09 PM
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Per current code.... dryers are connected with four wires. (two hots, one neutral and one ground)
If your dryer is currently wired with three wires....convert it when you move it outside.

You'll need GFI receptacles.

A sub panel would work. There again.... four wires. Grounds and neutrals are kept separated.
 
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Old 02-07-15, 04:40 AM
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Should I just run three #6 conductors and put in a subpanel? Or run all the conductors I need for all these devices?
Unless your main panel is very close, I'd also go go with a subpanel. Like PJ says, you need 4 wires to a subpanel and 4 wires to the dryer. All you need for a 4th wire for that 60 amp subpanel with the 3 #6s is a #10 for the ground.

Just a FYI......
Dryer will need three #10 conductors - two hots for 240V and a ground.
Dryers have never been allowed to just have two hots and a ground, they had two hots and a neutral. Grounding was done through the neutral till the 1996 NEC changed it to 4 wire.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 02-07-15 at 07:16 AM. Reason: qith>go with
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Old 02-07-15, 09:44 AM
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4 wire OK, I forgot about that, a brain fart LOL.

So it's better to run four #6s to the lean to with a subpanel then to run everything individually.

Will a 2" PVC conduit be sufficient for 4 #6s? or 1.5"? I think 1.5" is probably too tight.
 
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Old 02-07-15, 11:15 AM
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Four #6s will fit in a 1" PVC conduit.
 
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Old 02-07-15, 11:45 AM
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You don't need four #6 conductors. With less than a 100 ampere sub-main breaker feeding the new panel you only need a #10 for the equipment grounding conductor. Using type THHN/THWN individual conductors you could go to a 70 ampere sub-main breaker.
 
 

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