Surge Suppression Receptacle on a GFCI Circuit

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  #1  
Old 02-07-15, 08:37 PM
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Surge Suppression Receptacle on a GFCI Circuit

Hi all, I have a fairly new home (2006) in FL and would like to replace a standard receptacle with a surge suppression receptacle in my kitchen. The circuit I would like to add the surge suppression receptacle to already has a GFCI receptacle that covers it. There are about 3-4 receptacles in the circuit and one of them is a GFCI receptacle.

What i am getting at is if I have a circuit that has one GFCI receptacle, one Surge Suppression receptacle, and (2) standard receptacles (again, all on the same circuit), am i violating any code rules and/or reducing or impeding the protection on my current circuit. Thanks for any insight.
 
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Old 02-07-15, 08:42 PM
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The TVSS (transient voltage surge suppressor) receptacle would still be required to be GFCI protected. The easiest way to do this would be to have the GFCI protection upstream of the TVSS device, which it sounds like it already is.

This will not violate any NEC rules.
 

Last edited by Tolyn Ironhand; 02-07-15 at 09:09 PM.
  #3  
Old 02-07-15, 08:55 PM
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Tolyn,

Thanks for the response. Yes, I would not be removing the GFCI receptacle, but replacing a standard receptacle that is already a part of the GFCI circuit with a surge suppression receptacle.

This would still have the GFCI on the same circuit as the Suppression receptacle. I hope I'm not making it too confusing, thanks.
 
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Old 02-07-15, 09:03 PM
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What makes you think you need a surge suppresser on a kitchen circuit?
 
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Old 02-08-15, 05:45 AM
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Well, we had this fancy automatic paper towel dispenser that worked great up until a momentary power outage that was related to a lightning storm. It created a momentary that seems to have damaged the unit. It no longer powers on and i have confirmed that the transformer that powers it up is still functional and providing the output voltage it is rated for.

I will be purchasing another towel dispenser (my unit is out of warranty) and I want to do what I can to safeguard against it.
 
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Old 02-08-15, 06:05 AM
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we had this fancy automatic paper towel dispenser that worked great up until a momentary power outage that was related to a lightning storm
That is precisely why I like a whole house surge device installed at the main service panel. All new appliances today, including furnaces, air conditioners and soon water heaters, are loaded with electronic, a good lightning storm could wipe them all out in an instant.
 
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Old 02-08-15, 06:28 AM
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I never thought of going the whole home route. What do you think of this device Square D Homeline SurgeBreaker Surge Protective Device Takes 2 Load Center Spaces-HOM2175SB - The Home Depot
 
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Old 02-08-15, 06:33 AM
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Note, Tolyn said <to have the GFCI protection upstream of the TVSS device>. It isn't clear from what I'm reading that you have identified the sequence in which these receptacles are wired. Down stream is protected, but upstream will not be.

Bud
 
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Old 02-08-15, 08:03 AM
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The surge breaker is very easy to install, especially if you have space for a two pole breaker.
 
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Old 02-08-15, 08:17 AM
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Bud,

You are correct, i have not identified the sequence of the outlets. Is there a way (a tool) that could assist in this, or should i just go the whole house SPD route. I realize that i could do both which should increase my level of protection... However, if there is no easy way of determining the sequence of my receptacles to determine where the GFCI is located within the stream (outside of getting an electrician involved), i may just go the whole house route and call it a day.
 
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Old 02-08-15, 08:21 AM
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Many times the gfi is the first in the string so it can probably downstream protection to the other receptacles. Trip the gfi and see what loses power. Anything that does not lose power on the same circuit is upstream of the gfi.
 
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Old 02-08-15, 03:34 PM
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Pcboss,

Thanks, great direction, i will proceed with this.
 
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