Wiring a dishwasher

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  #1  
Old 02-13-15, 03:52 PM
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Wiring a dishwasher

I'm installing a dishwasher in my apartment. There building is 120 years old and there is no junction box our outlets inside the cabinets. There is however an outlet above the counter where the dishwasher will go, so presumably there is a wire inside the wall near where the dishwasher will go. My question is, if break into the wall and find the wiring going to the outlet, can I just splice the dishwasher in using a wire nut or is there more to think about than that?
 
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Old 02-13-15, 04:07 PM
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If you do not own the building no way should be altering the wiring in anyway.
Has the wiring in that building been upgraded so there's even a ground?
 
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Old 02-13-15, 04:08 PM
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Welcome to the forums! First, it is an apartment and you most likely have no authority to modify the unit. Contact your landlord to have the work done by a licensed electrician. As to your specific questions, you may not utilize any countertop small appliance receptacle for the dishwasher. It should have a dedicated circuit or one separate from the small appliance GFCI protected circuits. When was the remodel performed bringing in to the 20th or 21st century?
 
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Old 02-13-15, 06:11 PM
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The landlord, who lives above me, has already given me approval to install the dishwasher as long as I pay for it. All of the outlets in the kitchen have GFCI. I believe they were put in about a year ago as the kitchen was renovated before I moved in, so I'm assuming the wiring is up to date. The breaker panel in the basement also looks reasonably new. I believe the building was converted from a single family townhouse to 5 apartments in the early 90s. Each unit is individually metered, so I'm assuming it was brought up to code around then, or more recently (The meters are all digital AMR type). All of the outlets in the apartment have grounds.

I don't ever use the outlet in question for anything as it is in an odd location so overloading it with lots of devices isn't really a concern. I guess what I'm really wondering is if there is any reason why we can't use the wiring to that outlet, either as a splice or by disconnecting the outlet. I just don't want to have to pay for an NYC union electrician at $120 an hour to run wiring 2 floors down to the breaker panel, and I doubt the landlord would allow it if it were that complicated anyway.
 
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Old 02-13-15, 06:23 PM
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The problem is that it violates the electrical code. There are many things that can be done, but if we bless them we are condoning the violations.
 
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Old 02-13-15, 06:28 PM
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I was planning on having the electrical work done professionally. I was just trying to get an idea if it is something that will be as simple as rewiring from the outlet or major work.

What about just relocating the outlet from above the counter to inside the cabinet and getting a 3 prong plug for the dishwasher like this:

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Whirlpool...23RP/202204764

I can't imagine that being against code since it is just moving an existing electric outlet.
 
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Old 02-13-15, 06:32 PM
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The receptacle to which you refer is probably on one of the two circuits for your Small Appliances and is in the GFCI protection loop. You can't just remove it, as code calls for them to be spaced at certain intervals. If you had a GFCI plug in tester, you could determine this rather quickly. Just plug it in and press the button. If a GFCI receptacle/breaker trips, it is part of the loop.
 
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Old 02-13-15, 06:39 PM
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Ok thanks. I don't have one of those. So what would I realistically have to do to do this within code?
 
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Old 02-13-15, 07:01 PM
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what would I realistically have to do to do this within code?
Run a new dedicated line from the breaker box.
 
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Old 02-13-15, 07:33 PM
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The landlord, who lives above me, has already given me approval to install the dishwasher as long as I pay for it.
It sounds to me like you have permission to hire and pay for an electrician. This project requires an electrical permit and inspection and possibly the same for the plumbing. I guess you know, the built-in dishwasher becomes part of the apartment and stays if you move out.
 
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Old 02-14-15, 03:43 AM
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The only correct way to do this is to run a new circuit from the panel.
 
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