Box Extenders


  #1  
Old 02-13-15, 06:29 PM
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Box Extenders

I have several receptacles on the kitchen backsplash area that are set too far into the wall.

The original metal boxes (1965) were set to be flushed to the wood stud face. Then they put the finished wall on, which consisted of 1/2" of gypsum board and 1/2" of brown coat and a think layer of egg shell plaster...then some time later then put a layer of 3/4" plywood over the entire back splash then put laminated surface over it.

So now, the original metal box is about 2" recessed from the finished surface.

I need to use box extenders.

Question is, what kind should I use?

I have seen plastic box extenders like this:



and I have seen metal ones like this:



and I also saw some blue ones Carlon makes.

Are they all intermixable? Or use the metal extender with the metal boxes and use plastic extenders for the plastic boxes?

I was going to buy the metal ones but they are so tight I worry that they can easily touch the side screws of a switch or receptacle and be energized unless I tape the devices.
 
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Old 02-13-15, 06:36 PM
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Since you have conduit the second one you showed would probably be best as it will have a grounding connection to the metal box. Otherwise, I like using the first one best. Check the depth on the metal one, as I don't think it will reach beyond 1 1/2".
 
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Old 02-13-15, 10:44 PM
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Use the plastic ones. Less of a chance of shorting. No need to tape the receptacle up to keep it from shorting to the extension ring.
 
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Old 02-14-15, 06:08 AM
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I agree with PJ. The extension is not a grounding path so it wouldn't matter if it is grounded or not.
 
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Old 02-14-15, 07:26 AM
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I always thought you had to tape all switches and receptacles. No matter what..
 
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Old 02-14-15, 07:56 AM
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It is not a NEC requirement to tape devices. A lot of people just do it.
 
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Old 02-14-15, 08:21 AM
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Only amateurs tape except in special circumstances. I'm betting an insurance investigator would see it as a red flag indicating the electrical work wasn't done by a pro.
 
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Old 02-14-15, 11:58 AM
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We will tape devices but typically only when working a circuit hot, especially when working on 277 volt circuits. I never recommend a DIYer working a circuit hot.
 
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Old 02-14-15, 12:26 PM
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We will tape devices but typically only when working a circuit hot
One of the special circumstances I was referring to.
 
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Old 02-17-15, 05:29 PM
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Since most homes I have occupied down here are EMT and metal boxes I tend to tape them. Even though it shouldn't matter if the breakers are off it just worries me that with a metal box it would be easier when backing out a switch or a receptacle the screws may accidentally touch the metal mud ring.
 
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Old 02-17-15, 07:14 PM
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The power should be off when installing or removing a device, especially in a home, thus negating the need for tape.
 
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Old 02-17-15, 07:26 PM
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Yes, but sometimes, in order to determine which circuit to turn off, one has to remove the switch plate especially if it's a new property and you are just "recon"ing what goes where, and there are times you can't turn off the entire house if you need lighting. So I am just saying there are circumstances I just feel safer with it. If I have plastic boxes I wouldn't be as paranoid.

I also think it's may be a regional thing. Most of the houses I came across, that were "original work" from the 60s, 70s, don't have any tape. Then the newer homes from the 80s would have everything taped. I don't know why. These are not DIYer work, these are original construction by pros.
 
 

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