prevent short in wire from microwave oven transformer

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  #1  
Old 02-18-15, 09:41 AM
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prevent short in wire from microwave oven transformer

how would i prevent a short in the primary coil if their was a small nick on it? could i melt rubber and put that on it or something? its only on one of the wires, is there something for this? like a spray on electrical retardant? if i ran it now, i doubt there would be an issue, its tiny and is only on one wire of the coil, it is not two wires near eachother that are nicked. i just want something to prevent any issues.
 
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Old 02-18-15, 09:46 AM
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Well, ideally you would replace the wire, but I understand how you would feel about that. If you could slip some heat shrink tubing over it that would be good. Otherwise you might want to try "liquid electrical tape". It's available at almost any hardware store or home center.
 
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Old 02-18-15, 09:54 AM
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can someone give me a site that explains how a microwave oven transformers. i mean, their two wires near eachother, so it magicly turns into a different voltage? i mean i understand the whole, turning into magnetic energy and then into dc energy and stuff but how do you decide how many windings and stuff? it may as well be wizard sh!t for all i know about how it really works when it comes down to it. also im trying to make a welder with two of these, and its annoying to find broken microwaves people dont want. their not on craigslist. i even put a wanted thing on craigslist.
 
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Old 02-18-15, 01:04 PM
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The term you want to search for is a "voltage doubler circuit" which microwave ovens use to power the magnetron. Working with microwave components is very dangerous without high voltage equipment and training -- they operate in the 5,000V range with plenty of power behind it. Well into the lethal territory even with gloves and multimeter probes and stuff like that.
 
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