Does exposed Romex under sink need to enclosed?

Reply

  #1  
Old 02-18-15, 01:29 PM
W
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: United States
Posts: 40
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Does exposed Romex under sink need to enclosed?

Hi,
I fished Romex thru the wall behind the dishwasher then drilled a hole in the adjoining wall under the sink to feed an electric box installed under the sink.
Thought I had done my due research, as in it's OK to fish Romex thru the wall without staples.
But now think I should have run Romex thru conduit where it comes out of the wall behind the dishwasher all the way to the outlet.
So can I sleeve that Romex in conduit right up to the hole in the wall? Doubt if I can leave the Romex exposed under the sink & behind the dishwasher as is?

Name:  IMG_20150215_141120.jpg
Views: 6451
Size:  32.2 KB
Name:  IMG_20150215_141113.jpg
Views: 11532
Size:  21.3 KB

thank you
 
  #2  
Old 02-18-15, 01:38 PM
pcboss's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 15,223
Received 103 Votes on 89 Posts
Type NM cable is only required to be protected "where subject to physical damage". This is entirely a judgement call, but IMO, it is not.

You should secure the cable to the surface as required.
 
  #3  
Old 02-18-15, 01:50 PM
W
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: United States
Posts: 40
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
My opinion as well, that it would not be subject to physical damage. Behind the dishwasher, no one will get near it there unless they remove the DW. And we will certainly never endanger that 7 inch length of Romex under the sink but if we sell the house will it pass inspection. Imagine you'll say depends on the building codes in Denver.

thank you
 
  #4  
Old 02-18-15, 01:58 PM
pcboss's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 15,223
Received 103 Votes on 89 Posts
You are not getting a code inspection if you sell the house. The home inspector may or may not say anything about this. Unfortunately they can write up anything they feel is an issue, even if it would pass code.
 

Last edited by pcboss; 02-18-15 at 02:24 PM.
  #5  
Old 02-18-15, 02:03 PM
W
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: United States
Posts: 40
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Oh, good point(s).

Thank you
 
  #6  
Old 02-18-15, 02:27 PM
F
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 18,495
Received 36 Votes on 28 Posts
Take a piece of 2x6 with a length equal to the distance from the wall to the far side of the electrical box. Rout out a channel for the cable to lay in and then glue this to the wall.
 
  #7  
Old 02-18-15, 02:31 PM
Handyone's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: U.S.
Posts: 5,450
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
If you are concerned, you can move the box closer to the right side of cabinet and feed the cable into the box from side knockout.
 
  #8  
Old 02-18-15, 02:39 PM
W
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: United States
Posts: 40
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
If you are concerned, you can move the box closer to the right side of cabinet and feed the cable into the box from side knockout
D'oh! Why didn't I see that?

Thanks
 
  #9  
Old 02-18-15, 08:03 PM
CasualJoe's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: United States
Posts: 10,758
Received 97 Votes on 87 Posts
Why a GFCI receptacle under the kitchen sink. This could be a problem in the future. It is accessible, but it isn't easily accessible.
 
  #10  
Old 02-18-15, 08:45 PM
W
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: United States
Posts: 40
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I mistakenly thought the GFCI went under the sink, it is now in an outlet above the counter. A normal receptacle is now under the sink fed from the GFCI outlet above w/toggle switch. For a disposal.
 
  #11  
Old 02-19-15, 07:47 PM
CasualJoe's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: United States
Posts: 10,758
Received 97 Votes on 87 Posts
Normally disposers aren't required to be GFCI proteced unless your area is on the 2014 NEC. Disposers aren't allowed to be on the small appliance branch circuits that serve the countertop receptacles unless the wirng is all existing from many years ago.
 
  #12  
Old 02-20-15, 07:07 AM
W
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: United States
Posts: 40
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
50 years ago. Same circuit that fed the old disposal (20 amp).
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: