Connecting a stove through a dryer outlet

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  #1  
Old 02-18-15, 06:52 PM
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Connecting a stove through a dryer outlet

I need to get a stovetop to use in my basement. The closest outlet is a dryer outlet. It has 3 prongs, 2 flat and one in a v shape. I am looking for the stove right now but will likely find one that has the 3 flat prongs or a 4 prong. What is my best method of going about this? Is there an adapter that goes straight from one to the other? I know I will need to get an extension cord as well to run maybe 20 ft. I will check tomorrow to see if I can get away with 15ft adn the stove cord depending where I will place it. I should be able to remove the plug on a stove and replace it with the right one shouldn't i?
 
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Old 02-18-15, 06:55 PM
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No, No, NO! Your stove is most likely a higher draw than the dryer and you sure as heck can't use an extension cord. And no, there are no adapters.

Use a hotplate if you need to cook something.
 
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Old 02-18-15, 07:03 PM
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I would only ever use 2 of the burners and never the over on this. Hotplates just don't heat enough to heat an all american 941 pressure cooker to temp. It is 41qts. Right now I am having to use 2 hot plates on one cooker where I could use 1 stove burner. Only my stove burner is glass top and not useable. Also don't want to delay dinner ever lol
 
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Old 02-18-15, 07:08 PM
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3 Prong Clothes Dryer Extension Cord 15 Feet NEMA 10 30 | eBay
Also why do they make those? They have them in all types of 220v plugs.
 
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Old 02-18-15, 07:09 PM
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First off a 3 prong dryer does not meet current code so no way to plug in a code compliant cord for the stove top. Second stove tops are not rated to be plugged in so you would violate the manufacturers instructions They are hard wire only. Third as stated the amperage is too low for most stove tops. You can probably run a correct circuit for less then the cost of an extension cord.
Also why do they make those? They have them in all types of 220v plugs.
Because there is no rule what they sell has to be safe or code compliant. The pictured extension cord is obviously not factory made but made in somebody's garage.
 
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Old 02-18-15, 08:40 PM
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Trust me, you CAN get an electric hotplate that will be more than sufficient for your pressure cooker but you won't find it at the local department store. You need to check with restaurant and commercial kitchen suppliers.

You can also get high capacity, up to 1800 watts, in a 120 volt hotplate although that would require a dedicated 20 ampere circuit.
 
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Old 02-19-15, 05:29 AM
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Wow so it is technically illegal that my house has the 3 prong dryer outlet? My stove as well upstairs runs through a 3 prong but it is one with 3 flat prongs, not bent one like the one downstairs and it runs my whirlpool flat top stove. Also my All American specifically says not to use with induction I believe or flat top stove at least which I believe is induction. Other than this the highest rated burners I can find are 1500w coils. The problem with these isn't the 150 dollars I have to spend but the still uncertainty that they will work especially with reviews I'm reading. It will get expensive testing and sending them back. Right now my best option has been to take 2 single 1000w hotplates and use those since its wide enough to cover 2, maybe even 3 lol but I don't like risking a tip over. Sorry don't mistake my questioning for anything but an eagerness to learn more. I respect everything you guys are teaching me
 
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Old 02-19-15, 05:37 AM
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Also, what if I purchased a 220v hotplate? Is there anyway of wiring that so it could safely use that outlet via some sort of adapter?
 
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Old 02-19-15, 05:41 AM
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Your house was probably build prior to the code updating requirements for grounding purposes which entails 4 prong receptacles and plugs. Cooktops are hardwired. Stoves are plug 'n play. The reason your upstairs stove has that three flat prong plug is that it is rated (along with the wiring and overcurrent protection) at 50 amps, not 30 as your dryer is. Your pressure cooker is probably aluminum and will not work on induction, and will be too heavy for glass top stoves, thus the warning.

Why not do it right, rewire for the stove with proper cable, receptacle and buy a stove that will do the job?
 
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Old 02-19-15, 06:12 AM
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an eagerness to learn more
If you want to learn, here's the rundown:

- You are calling what you want to install a "Stovetop", it is called a "Range". I know this because you said it has an oven

- It is possible for you to install a "Cook Top", but it is highly dependent on a few things.

1. You would have to abandon Dryer. No using both dryer and Cook Top.
2. You would have to open up dryer outlet and tell us what wires are there.

- Shut off Power to dryer!! Even though you have a 3-prong outlet on dryer, there might be a ground in the box.

- In order to install Cook Top, you would need one of the following configurations of wires. Either:

1. 2 hot wires and 1 neutral (all insulated) Plus bare ground (4-wire)
2. 2 hot wires (insulated) and 1 bare ground

Important: If you have 2 hot wires and 1 neutral (white insulated) only, this will not work.
 
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Old 02-19-15, 06:20 AM
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about how much money would I be looking to invest to add another 50 amp outlet in my basement? I was hoping to be able to switch back and forth between the dryer and cook top but am realizing thats not gonna work. Honestly my 2 separate coil idea doesn't sound the worst. I would need a for of balancing by bricks or somethign in case one of the coils broke under pressure or something. But before I give in, I'd like to see abou possibley just adding another outlet and am ready to hear what would need to be done so I can further research today
 
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Old 02-19-15, 06:28 AM
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Yeah,
It's better to run a new circuit. Post a picture of your main panel.
Cost depends on how far the panel is from the Range location.

http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...rt-images.html
 
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