60/50 Hz problem with washing machine

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Old 02-25-15, 02:41 AM
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60/50 Hz problem with washing machine

My daughter has moved to South America, taking a UK washing machine with her. She has discovered that her 50 Hz machine won't run on the 60Hz there. How can she solve this problem ?
 
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Old 02-25-15, 03:52 AM
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Unfortunately, the only cost effective answer is to buy a new machine. Changing the components of the current machine would be quite costly with no guarantee of longevity.
 
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Old 02-25-15, 04:25 AM
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Isn't it possible to buy a converter to use between the mains socket and the machine ?
 
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Old 02-25-15, 05:38 AM
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Hi, cheaper you buy a new washer.
Frequency Converters, 60Hz, 50Hz, 400Hz | GoHz.com
Geo
 

Last edited by ray2047; 02-25-15 at 07:29 AM. Reason: yo>you
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Old 02-25-15, 10:12 AM
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As the others posted, it is not as easy as changing voltage, you have to change frequency. It is not cost effective to buy a frequency converter unless she is emotionally attached to the washer.
 
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Old 02-28-15, 02:11 AM
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I have worked with conversions of different industrial machines, and never had that problem. It should be possible to solve but I need to know more than its not working. What's on the markings on machine, what is the voltage measured in the socket, are the water pressure different? E.g. We have typical pressure of 6 BAR here in Norway, but many places in UK they have far less...
What country, what "standards"??

dsk
 
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Old 02-28-15, 06:33 AM
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You need to describe how it is not working.

Completely dead?

Makes funny noises?

Panel that should show lighted numbers shows obviously wrong numbers or is blank?
 
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Old 02-28-15, 08:34 AM
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Hi, cheaper you buy a new washer.
Frequency Converters, 60Hz, 50Hz, 400Hz | GoHz.com
Geo
depending on the SA country, cheaper to get a full time cleaning lady.
 
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Old 02-28-15, 09:41 AM
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I have worked with conversions of different industrial machines, and never had that problem. It should be possible to solve
But industrial machines cost far more. While replacing or rewinding motors for those make sense or even installing a complete distribution system for a second power source makes sense in an industrial situation that is not likely to be true for a home situation.
 
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Old 03-02-15, 05:44 AM
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Most SA countries has "110 V" even when having European style outlets, extremely confusing. You do have to check carefully to be sure. 50 and 60 Hz here and there, and that are usually no problem.

When you have a 110V system (110-125) it will often be available the double voltage.
A transformer 120V to 240 will be quite big to cover motor + heat elements of e.g. 2 kW, The heating may work at half voltage and give 1/4 wattage. No good solution, so we have to find something 208-250V 50-60 Hz

dsk
 
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Old 03-02-15, 07:36 AM
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A transformer 120V to 240 will be quite big to cover motor + heat elements
In most North American dryers only the heat is 240v. Motor and controls are 120 volts. This way the manufacturer keeps costs down. Both electric and gas versions of the dryer are mostly the same. Only difference one has a gas heat source and the other electric.
 
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