replacing Cadet wall heater

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Old 02-26-15, 08:22 PM
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replacing Cadet wall heater

I have a Cadet wall heater that is only blowing cold air. I would like to replace it but I am not sure if I need a 110v one or a 220v one. It is wired into a 220v double breaker but there are two Cadet wall heaters wired into that 220v double breaker. Since there are two of them does that mean that each one is 110v?
 
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Old 02-26-15, 08:44 PM
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Do you have 2 wires under each screw at the breaker? If so then they are 240V (no 110 or 220V anymore, it's 120 and 240).

They could still be 240V even if there aren't 2 wires under each. Depends on how they are wired.

Whats the breaker rating?

There should be a label or plate somewhere on the unit. Turn the breaker off, remove the bad one, cap the wires, look for model or info plate/label.
 
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Old 02-27-15, 05:45 AM
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Just a thought,but is that heater clean and not full of dirt etc. which could have caused a limit switch to trip?
Geo
 
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Old 02-27-15, 07:46 AM
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Only way to know for sure is to take the cover off and measure the voltage at the heater.

Also, I don't know about Cadet but others are multiple wattages so sometimes changing a jumper can provide heat again on a coil that was not previously used.
 
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Old 02-27-15, 09:01 PM
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It is a 30amp breaker

It is a Cadet Model CS202, 240/208 volt, 2000/1500 watts, 8.3/7amps
 
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Old 02-27-15, 09:38 PM
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Well, then it's 240V. Why the big issue. You don't run a 240V unit on 120V.
 
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Old 02-27-15, 10:03 PM
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So you are running two 240v heaters on one two pole breaker. That's good.
Your replacement will be a 240v heater at 2000w to match the old one.
 
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Old 02-27-15, 10:23 PM
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PJ..Isn't a 30A breaker oversized for the load? Or is it because of the continuous load? Whats the rule for that?
 
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Old 02-28-15, 07:07 AM
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The rule is that the heater has a maximum circuit rating and/or a recommended circuit rating in addition to the running current. Unfortunately the first two are not always stated in the instruction manual.

The significance of the maximum circuit rating is that sometimes you may not combine two or three of the heaters on a single circuit that has an amperes rating large enough for all three.

Heaters are considered continuous loads in which case the circuit should be rated for 1-1/4 times the running cuirrnet. For cord and plug appliajnces, the plug implies the maximum circuit rating. You can make an educated guess that for appliances with running currnet well under 20 amps the maximum circuit rating is 20 amps.
 
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