Simple lamp circuit question!

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  #1  
Old 03-04-15, 08:23 PM
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Simple lamp circuit question!

Making a lamp for a project. Please help. Here is a similar lamp showing 2 bulbs. i am just running plain 2 wire no ground. The only thing different is each lamp socket has a switch for on and off power (may or may not be relevant?). Im confused how to wire them both together i dont know much about electrical circuits beyond a simple one lamp. Could someone draw me a diagram or something? It would be greatly appreciated.


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Old 03-04-15, 08:44 PM
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What are you trying to do? Have them turn on and off together? Connect the wires from each of the two sockets together and then connect them to a switch. Once the main switch is on, switch the individual switches as needed to turn the lights on then use the main switch from then on out.

something like this.[ATTACH=CONFIG]47540[/ATTACH] (note this is 30 seconds of MS Paint, not professional advice)
 
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Old 03-04-15, 08:47 PM
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You need to use a polarized plug. The neutral (wide blade) must go to the screw shell of the lamp socket (silver screw). Usually with lamp cord the neutral wire has a rib or whiting on it. A cord with ground would be safer for a metal lamp.

Do the lamp sockets have switches? If not do you want separate switches for each?
 
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Old 03-04-15, 08:57 PM
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Thank you for taking the time Esand1! I would like to avoid a main switch and just be able to have constant power and switch either lamp on or off as needed.

not sure how to multi quote on this forum. Ray2047 i think the ground is a good idea, not sure how to work that into this though as i really dont know much about electrical like i said. Each lamp has a switch yes. They are older lamp sockets from like 1920 so they dont have different screws like you said. Also worth noting i am not using lamp cord per say i was just going to cut a cord off an old appliance or electronic. What is the purpose of a polarized plug?
 
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Old 03-04-15, 08:58 PM
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That is pretty cool. You'll need to connect a piece of two wire lamp cord to each socket. The power cord splices to the two lamp wires somewhere inside the frame.

I'd make that valve like thing a dimmer.
 
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Old 03-04-15, 09:07 PM
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Well if then just join the wires together after the switches and connect them to a plug.

I assume you've got something like this?




x2 on that lamp looking awesome.
 
  #7  
Old 03-05-15, 12:51 PM
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Yes esand1 they look like that. how can i go about using a polarized plug/grounded wire? i know how to hook everything up except i dont know where the ground goes in this situation
 
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Old 03-05-15, 12:56 PM
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On a two prong polarized plug, the wide blade (neutral) goes to the screw part of the Edison bulb socket. In a three prong grounded plug, the ground would get screwed or soldered directly to the copper frame. Agreed that a three-wire grounded plug is a good idea given the lamp is metal.
 
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Old 03-05-15, 01:12 PM
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An aside, do not use plumbing solder or paste flux or acid on electric wires. Use only electronic solder (63/37 or 60/40 or 50/50 non-leadfree solder with rosin core).

The electronic solder may also be used to hold the pipe sections together.
 
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Old 03-05-15, 06:22 PM
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An aside, do not use plumbing solder or paste flux or acid on electric wires. Use only electronic solder (63/37 or 60/40 or 50/50 non-leadfree solder with rosin core).

I have been using plumbing solder/flux. Care to elaborate on why not? It did cross my mind that possibly this flux would corrode the insulation on the wires etc but id like to hear your thoughts on it.
 
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Old 03-05-15, 09:58 PM
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I have been using plumbing solder/flux. Care to elaborate on why not? It did cross my mind that possibly this flux would corrode the insulation on the wires etc but id like to hear your thoughts on it.

Plumbing flux is conductive and some of it is also going to corrode your connections. Your best option is 60/40 rosin-core leaded solder. Also get a little container of rosin flux for your pipe fittings.
 
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