How do I test the voltage in my exhaust fan?

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  #1  
Old 03-05-15, 12:20 AM
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How do I test the voltage in my exhaust fan?

Hey guys,

I'll be replacing my kitchen's exhaust fan (it's a LUFTIG from IKEA). So this means disconnecting the wires. But naturally, I want to make sure that I don't electrocute myself.

I'll be getting a voltmeter/multimeter, but I have no idea how to test my exhaust fan for electric activity. I've checked several Youtube videos, and while many of them do a great job showing you how to check your batteries there don't seem to be any that show you how to test your appliances' wires before you start touching them.

Here's the exhaust fan's underside:


And another photo:

  • Where do I place the test probes? Directly on the wire? On the circuit board?
  • Do I select AC for the multimeter's settings? And what scale of measurement is most appropriate for this type of appliance?

I'm really new to the world of wiring and electronics (I'm a software developer, for cryin' out loud). Help me avoid getting electrocuted while replacing this exhaust fan!
 
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  #2  
Old 03-05-15, 03:42 AM
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Check between the open holes of the push in connectors between white and black.
 
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Old 03-05-15, 03:43 AM
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To test if there is voltage at the exhaust fan, turn the fan and light on. IF they don't come on, you have no voltage. You can then remove the yellow bcaps and test across the black and white wire with your multimeter. If it is an analog meter, set it to 200 volts or so (higher than expected voltage) AC and test it. The needle will move if you have voltage.
 
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Old 03-05-15, 08:42 AM
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Thanks for the fast responses, guys.

chandler- after replacing the bcaps, do I put both the red and black test probe on the black wire, then the white wite? Or is it black probe on black, and red prod on white?

pcboss- I'm not quite sure which one of the parts there is a push-in connector (Google image search isn't being helpful with this, unfortunately. I've circled what I think the push-in connectors are. Am I correct?



I know how basic these questions are, but again- I'm totally new to this and really want to learn.
 
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Old 03-05-15, 10:18 AM
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Or is it black probe on black, and red prod on white?
One probe on black and one on white.

Since you are measuring an AC voltage..... the leads have no direction or polarity. You can interchange the red and black leads.

When measuring DC, like batteries, the red is + and the black is -.
 
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Old 03-05-15, 11:25 AM
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The circled part is a one time use push in connector. The yellow is a wire nut.
 
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Old 03-05-15, 02:44 PM
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As Jim said, you can back stab the connectors with your probes without removing the bcaps. I really like my method of just turning it on to check and see if you turned the proper breaker off. No technology involved
 
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Old 03-05-15, 03:14 PM
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Wow, has it ever been used? Usually replacing those things is a disgustingly gross job with the amount of grease caked up on the wires. :-)
 
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Old 03-05-15, 03:36 PM
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I'm with Larry. Turn it on and then flip breakers until it stops. If the motor is bad, then just use the light as an indicator of when the power is off.
 
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Old 03-05-15, 06:32 PM
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Wow, has it ever been used? Usually replacing those things is a disgustingly gross job with the amount of grease caked up on the wires. :-)
I was thinking the same thing, this looks like a new unit. Why are you changing the fan?
 
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